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Adown   Listen
adverb
Adown  adv.  From a higher to a lower situation; downward; down, to or on the ground. (Archaic) "Thrice did she sink adown."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Adown" Quotes from Famous Books



... In another year, this first babe became "the other baby," and was put on a bottle with its little pug-nose out of joint. There was always one on bread and milk, one on the bottle and one with nose under the shawl—and all the time the sonnets came fluttering adown the summer winds. ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Vol. 13 - Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Lovers • Elbert Hubbard

... contained in the list above, are (or have been) occasionally employed in English as prepositions: as, A, (chiefly used before participles,) abaft, adown, afore, aloft, aloof, alongside, anear, aneath, anent, aslant, aslope, astride, atween, atwixt, besouth, bywest, cross, dehors, despite, inside, left-hand, maugre, minus, onto, opposite, outside, per, plus, sans, spite, thorough, traverse, ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... precipice Titanic Of the congregated Fall, And the angle oceanic Where the deepening thunders call— And the Gorge so grim, And the firmamental rim! Multitudinously thronging The waters all converge, Then they sweep adown in sloping ...
— Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War • Herman Melville

... did he pass Through the green evening quiet in the sun, O'er many a heath, through many a woodland dun, Through buried paths, where sleepy twilight dreams The summer time away. One track unseams A wooded cleft, and, far away, the blue Of ocean fades upon him; then, anew, He sinks adown a solitary glen, Where there was never sound of mortal men, Saving, perhaps, some snow-light cadences 80 Melting to silence, when upon the breeze Some holy bark let forth an anthem sweet, To cheer itself to Delphi. Still his feet Went swift beneath the merry-winged guide, Until it reached ...
— Endymion - A Poetic Romance • John Keats

... beauty of her hair bewilders me— Pouring adown the brow, its cloven tide Swirling about the ears on either side And storming around the neck tumultuously: Or like the lights of old antiquity Through mullioned windows, in cathedrals wide, Spilled moltenly o'er figures deified In chastest marble, nude of drapery. And so I love ...
— Riley Love-Lyrics • James Whitcomb Riley

... haunting all the world, Fair face of Beauty all too fair to see, Where the lost stars adown the ...
— The Souls of Black Folk • W. E. B. Du Bois

... up, but only by curling himself round and taking off his snow-shoes. By degrees he got the snow-shoes put on again, and mounted out of the hole which he had made, with snow adhering to all his garments and snow melting adown his neck and wrists. He now realised that he had spent nearly half an hour in walking not a quarter of a mile. With this cheerless reflection as a companion he went doggedly on, choosing now the drifted main road ...
— A Dozen Ways Of Love • Lily Dougall

... rose The lowly daisy sweetly blows, Though large the forest monarch throws His army shade, Yet green the juicy hawthorne grows Adown the glade." ...
— Verses and Rhymes by the way • Nora Pembroke

... gash'd and gored, He lives to taste the bitterness of death. Even now they meet their doom. The bloody Couthon, The fierce St. Just, even now attend their tyrant To fall beneath the axe. I saw the torches Flash on their visages a dreadful light— I saw them whilst the black blood roll'd adown Each stern face, even then with dauntless eye Scowl round contemptuous, dying as they ...
— Literary Remains (1) • Coleridge

... before anybody can remember), a fountain gushed out of a hillside in the marvelous land of Greece. And, for aught I know, after so many thousand years it is still gushing out of the very selfsame spot. At any rate, there was the pleasant fountain welling freshly forth and sparkling adown the hillside in the golden sunset when a handsome young man named Bellerophon drew near its margin. In his hand he held a bridle studded with brilliant gems and adorned with a golden bit. Seeing an old man and another of middle age and a little boy near the fountain, and likewise ...
— Journeys Through Bookland V2 • Charles H. Sylvester

... wrights that wrought it, and silver nailed its doors; Earls' wives were the weaving-women, queens' daughters strewed its floors, And the masters of its song-craft were the mightiest men that cast The sails of the storm of battle adown the bickering blast. There dwelt men merry-hearted, and in hope exceeding great Met the good days and the evil as they went the way of fate: There the Gods were unforgotten, yea whiles they walked with men. Though e'en ...
— The Story of Sigurd the Volsung and the Fall of the Niblungs • William Morris

... a charm: he knew all its roughnesses, and the thorns that scratched the bare legs of the goatherds; he knew the lank heifers, that fed, "like grasshoppers," only on dew; he knew what clatter the brooks made, tumbling headlong adown ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. XI., April, 1863, No. LXVI. - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics. • Various

... this pageant of sublunar things Oblivion spreads her unrelenting wings, And sweeps adown her dark unebbing tide Man, and his mightiest monuments of pride— Alone, aloft, immutable, sublime, Star-like, ensphered above the track of time, Great SHAKSPEARE beams with undiminish'd ray. His bright creations sacred from ...
— Poems (1828) • Thomas Gent

... reached Barnec Hill at last; There rested he, and then we passed Up the high hill before him, and: 'Is there no hunting hut at hand?' He thus addressed us; 'The daylight Is gone, and shelter for the night We lack.' He scarce had ended, when Gazing adown the rocky glen, On the left hand, just opposite, He saw a house with its fire lit; 'That house till now I've never seen, Though many a time and oft I've been In this wild glen. Come, look ...
— Ireland, Historic and Picturesque • Charles Johnston

... wonder-light that wraps the star, Come now, come now; Sun-breathing Dragon, ray thy lights afar, Thy children bow; Hush with more awe the breath; the bright-browed races Are nothing worth By those dread gods from out whose awful faces The earth looks forth Infinite pity, set in calm; their vision cast Adown the years Beholds how beauty burns away at last Their children's tears. Now while our hearts the ancient quietness Floods with its tide, The things of air and fire and height no less In it abide; And from their wanderings over sea ...
— AE in the Irish Theosophist • George William Russell

... wind, from the open casement, fanned My brow and Helen's, as we, hand in hand, Sat looking out upon the twilight scene, In dreamy silence. Helen's dark blue eyes, Like two lost stars that wandered from the skies Some night adown the meteor's shining track, And always had been grieving to go back, Now gazed up, wistfully, at heaven's dome, And seemed to recognize and long for home. Her sweet voice broke the silence: "Wish, Maurine, Before you speak! you know the moon is new, And anything you wish for will come true Before ...
— Maurine and Other Poems • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... glade: and all the world seemed glad. And as the queen listened to pleasant sounds of wit and gossip, murmuring around her, the courtiers, at sound of a well-known footstep, suddenly ceasing their discourse, fell back on either side adown the room. At that moment the king entered, leading a lady apparelled in magnificent attire, the contour of whose face and outline of whose figure distinguished her as a woman of ...
— Royalty Restored - or, London under Charles II. • J. Fitzgerald Molloy

... making every one around them uncomfortable, and in the happy faculty which they possessed in an eminent degree, of imparting injurious doubts and covert insinuations as to the manners and habits of their neighbors, who else might have journeyed peacefully adown the vale of life in perfect good faith with all the world; moreover, they hated a mystery, did these two sister-spinsters, from their own innate frankness and openness of disposition, they said, and considered themselves so much in duty bound to ferret out the solution ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXIII No. 3 September 1848 • Various

... death! But if I might of the earl win to me the country; then might I say my sooth words, that God himself had granted good to me, if I might fell my foes to ground anon, and avenge my dear kindred, whom they have laid adown!" ...
— Brut • Layamon

... several inches in diameter, that glitter like great stars behind their heels. They have tight-fitting jackets of velveteen, closed in front, and over the bosom elaborately embroidered; scarfs of China crape round their waists, the ends dangling adown the left hip, terminating in a fringe of gold cord; on their heads sombreros with broad brim, and band of bullion—the toquilla. In addition, each has over his shoulders a manga—the most magnificent of outside garments, ...
— The Flag of Distress - A Story of the South Sea • Mayne Reid

... a little space, Meet we in this Alpine place, Before you leap adown the vale Or I along ...
— Thoughts, Moods and Ideals: Crimes of Leisure • W.D. Lighthall

... the wavy sea, The strength of our two founts in vain, For two opposing powers hold it concealed, Lest it go rolling aimlessly adown. The strength unmeasured of the burning heart, Withholds a passage to the lofty streams; Barring their twofold course unto the sea, Nature abhors the covered ground.[W] Now say, afflicted heart, what canst thou bring To oppose against us ...
— The Heroic Enthusiast, Part II (Gli Eroici Furori) - An Ethical Poem • Giordano Bruno

... by his side. The Wazirs and Councillors and Courtiers one and all fumed with envy and jealousy to see two unknowns entreated with such especial favour; and as they rode at the head of the suite adown the market-street all eyes were turned upon the youths and men asked one of other, "Who be the two who ride beside the Shah? Belong they to this city, or come they from some foreign land?" And the folk praised and blessed them saying, "Allah send our King of kings two Princes as godly and gallant ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... the village fathers, By river, lake, and shore, When far adown the steep of Time The vision rose once more I saw along the winter snow A spectral column pour, And high above their broken ranks A tattered ...
— The Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Complete • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... nightingale adown the lane Shakes with the force and volume of his song A hawthorn's ...
— Platform Monologues • T. G. Tucker

... bonnie flowers o' Paradise, And a' that 's bloom'd sinsyne, By bank an' brae an' lover's bower, Adown the course o' time, Or 'neath the gardener's fostering hand,— Their annual bloom renew, Ilk blade o' grass has had as weel Its ain sweet drap ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume V. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... nature mild, To wife consigns his hat, and takes the child; But she a day like this hath never felt, "Oh! that this too, too solid flesh would melt, Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew." Such monstrous heat! dear me! she never knew. Adown her innocent and beauteous face, The big, round, pearly drops each other chase; Thence trickling to those hills, erst white as snow, That now like AEtna's mighty mountains glow, They hang like dewdrops on the full blown rose, And to the ambient air their sweets disclose. ...
— The Works of William Hogarth: In a Series of Engravings - With Descriptions, and a Comment on Their Moral Tendency • John Trusler

... "Adown the orchard aisles they come, methinks,— My lord who guardest well his treasure chests, Attended by his squire and faithful drudge, And back to town I soon must lightly skip Else father will ...
— Otherwise Phyllis • Meredith Nicholson

... which to serve the stomach meet, What art and nature can afford. I'll furious cram, devoid of fear, Let but the roast and boil'd appear; Let me but see a smoking dish, I care not whether fowl or fish; Then rush ye floods of ale adown my throat, And in my ...
— Boswell's Correspondence with the Honourable Andrew Erskine, and His Journal of a Tour to Corsica • James Boswell

... broken on that morn,[B] Before the sun had shed his rays around, While blackest darkness heralded the dawn, The little fleet had left its anchor-ground; With not a lantern showing light or gleam, It floated silently adown the stream. ...
— The Song of the Exile—A Canadian Epic • Wilfred S. Skeats

... the wood-land, Muckintosh, the great and mighty, Muckintosh, the famous thinker, He whose brain was all his weapons, As against his rival's soarings, High unto the vaulted heavens, Low adown the swarded earth, Rolled he round his gaze all steely, And his voice like music prayed: "Oh, Creator, wondrous Spirit, Thou who hast for us descended In the guise of knowledge mighty, And our brains with truth o'er-flooded; In the greatness of thy wisdom, Knowest not our limitations? ...
— Violets and Other Tales • Alice Ruth Moore

... Now, the war-hosts of the ancient commonwealths—not dependent on the mechanical contrivances of the modern army—were necessarily composed of the very best men: the strong-boned, the heart-stout, the sound in wind and limb. Under these conditions the State shuddered through all her frame, thrilled adown every filament, at the death of a single one of her sons in the field. As only the feeble, the aged, bided at home, their number after each battle became larger in proportion to the whole than before. Thus the nation, more and more, with ever-increasing rapidity, declined ...
— Prince Zaleski • M.P. Shiel

... sweet laughter; alas within me 5 Every lost sense falleth away for anguish; When as I look'd on thee, upon my lips no Whisper abideth, Straight my tongue froze, Lesbia; soon a subtle Fire thro' each limb streameth adown; with inward 10 Sound the full ears tinkle, on either eye night's Canopy darkens. Ease alone, Catullus, alone afflicts thee; Ease alone breeds error of heady riot; Ease hath entomb'd princes of old renown and ...
— The Poems and Fragments of Catullus • Catullus

... German foot goes seldom back Where armed foemen throng. But never had they faced in field So stern a charge before, And never had they felt the sweep Of Scotland's broad claymore. Not fiercer pours the avalanche Adown the steep incline, That rises o'er the parent springs Of rough and rapid Rhine— Scarce swifter shoots the bolt from heaven Than came the Scottish band, Right up against the guarded trench, And o'er it, sword in hand. In vain their leaders forward press— ...
— Lays of the Scottish Cavaliers and Other Poems • W.E. Aytoun

... themselves in their anxious minds! But now I see them, brother-like, with lighter steps, descending toward the head waters of the famed Oregon. They have reached the great stream, and seating themselves in a canoe, shoot adown the current, gazing on the beautiful shrubs and flowers that ornament the banks, and the majestic trees that cover the sides of the valley, all new to them, and presenting a wide field of discovery. The melodies of unknown ...
— Choice Specimens of American Literature, And Literary Reader - Being Selections from the Chief American Writers • Benj. N. Martin

... Adown and round the castle's steep, I let my glances wander; But cannot from the dizzy keep, Descry it, there or yonder. Oh, he who'd bring it to my sight, Or were he knave or were he knight, Should be my ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 57, No. 352, February 1845 • Various

... the field they piped full right, Even about the midst of the night; Adown from heaven they saw come ...
— In The Yule-Log Glow—Book 3 - Christmas Poems from 'round the World • Various

... thy desire? Let not the lust and ravin of the sword Bear thee adown the tide accursed, abhorred! Fling off thy passion's ...
— Suppliant Maidens and Other Plays • AEschylus

... stamp'd the earth, And dragging a huge coffin as his car, Two GOULS came on, of form more fearful-foul Than ever palsied in her wildest dream Hag-ridden Superstition. Then DESPAIR Seiz'd on the Maid whose curdling blood stood still. And placed her in the seat; and on they pass'd Adown the deep descent. A meteor light Shot from the Daemons, as they dragg'd along The unwelcome load, and mark'd their brethren glut On carcasses. Below the vault dilates Its ample bulk. "Look here!"—DESPAIR addrest ...
— Poems, 1799 • Robert Southey

... gently recline, 'Neath the clustering vine, The veil from futurity's vista is lifted, And adown life's wild tide, I rapidly glide, And into eternity's ocean am drifted; And there, soul of mine In regions divine, I meet thee, to part ...
— Cleveland Past and Present - Its Representative Men, etc. • Maurice Joblin

... Adown the ages there have come the sounds of that first singing, Lifting up the weary-hearted in the fever of the time; And I, who wait and wander far, felt all my soul upspringing, To but touch those ancient forces and ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... through the young mothers heart, and her arms tightened their clasp about the little form, while the hot tears chased each other adown her cheeks. One fell on ...
— Elsie's Womanhood • Martha Finley

... death of his sting; arms the child of God against the ills of life; and, lifting him up above its trials, makes him like some lofty mountain, at whose feet the lake may be lashed into foaming billows, and adown whose seamed and rugged sides clouds may fall in gloomy folds, but whose head, shooting up into the calm blue heavens, reposes in unbroken peace, rejoices in ...
— The Angels' Song • Thomas Guthrie

... constantly before their eyes at Execution Dock and on the shores of the Isle of Dogs, and their profound respect for the cat o' nine tails. They knew no morality; they had no other restraint; they all together slid, ran, fell, leaped, danced, and rolled swiftly and easily adown the Primrose Path; they fell into a savagery the like of which has never been known among English-folk since the days of their conversion to the Christian faith. It is only by searching and poking among unknown pamphlets and forgotten books that one finds out the actual ...
— As We Are and As We May Be • Sir Walter Besant

... anxious breast, Till day declines adown the West, And when, at night, I sink to rest, In dreams your ...
— Fugitive Pieces • George Gordon Noel Byron

... to see the lumber as it whirled Adown the tawny eddies that hissed and seethed and swirled, Now shooting through the rapids and, with a reeling swing, Into the foam-crests diving like ...
— Poems Teachers Ask For • Various

... modesty; And stints not Love to rend that veil * Garring disgrace on grace to alight; The robe of sickness then I donned * But rent to rags was secrecy: Wherefore my love and longing heart * Proclaim your high supremest might; The tear drop railing adown my cheek * Telleth my tale of ignomy: And all the hid was seen by all * And ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... our hemisphere unillumined by the rising beams, when the carolling of the birds that in gay chorus saluted the dawn among the boughs induced Fiammetta to rise and rouse the other ladies and the three gallants; with whom adown the hill and about the dewy meads of the broad champaign she sauntered, talking gaily of divers matters, until the sun had attained some height. Then, feeling his rays grow somewhat scorching, they retraced their steps, and returned to the villa; where, having ...
— The Decameron, Vol. II. • Giovanni Boccaccio

... always figures largely. To enumerate instances would be to inflict good folks with triteness and truism. I do not wish to rob my reader of his rights—think it out for yourself, beginning with Concord and Cambridge, working backward adown the centuries. ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Volume 6 - Subtitle: Little Journeys to the Homes of Eminent Artists • Elbert Hubbard

... world, though sadder for his loss, still strives to do its best without him; and our young men, nowadays, attend to model cottages, and incline to Tractarianism. Still the place, to an unreflecting eye, has its brilliancy and bustle; but it is a thoroughfare, not a lounge. And adown the thoroughfare, somewhat before the hour when the throng is thickest, passed two gentlemen of an appearance exceedingly out of keeping with the place.—Yet both had the air of men pretending to aristocracy,—an ...
— My Novel, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... Jupiter's comet family are not very conspicuous objects. They have small tails, and even in some cases have none at all. The family, too, does not contain many members, and yet one cannot but suppose that Jupiter, on account of his great mass, has had many opportunities for making captures adown ...
— Astronomy of To-day - A Popular Introduction in Non-Technical Language • Cecil G. Dolmage

... Elfin King said a charm which took away the very last bit of enchantment, and adown the huge hall that showed as if it were lit by the setting sun, and through the long passage of rough arches made of rock that was transparent and all encrusted with sheep-silver, rock-spar, and many bright stones, where twilight reigned, the three brothers and ...
— English Fairy Tales • Flora Annie Steel

... thing not rare— With sodden ground and chilly air; The sky presented everywhere A low-pitched roof of doleful grey; With a rain-flusht flood the river ran; Adown it floated a dying Swan, And loudly did lament. It was the middle of the day, The "Swanherd" and his men went on, "Nicking" ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 99, August 9, 1890. • Various

... were softly falling Adown on the landscape white, When the violet eyes of my first born Opened unto the light; And I thought as I pressed him to me, With loving, rapturous thrill, He was pure and fair as the snow-flakes That lay on ...
— The Poetical Works of Mrs. Leprohon (Mrs. R.E. Mullins) • Rosanna Eleanor Leprohon

... Adown his anxious features steal, Nor then one burst of pity feel? But, as bereav'd of ev'ry sense, Look on with cold indifference. Go, then, Annette, in all thy charms, Go bless some gayer, happier, arms; Go, rest secure, thy fear give o'er, These eyes shall follow thee no more; And never shall ...
— Poems • Sir John Carr

... struck above the square, When adown the Horse Shoe stair In his well-known coat of gray, Worn on many a hard-fought day, Came the man adored by all As their "Little Corporal," Forced by Europe now to ...
— Poems • John L. Stoddard

... flowers and stalks, That line the avenue; My broidered mantle all bedabbled with the dew! I climb a flight of steps with regal pride, And stroll along an echoing colonnade, Sweeping against its pillared balustrade, Adown a porch, and through a portal wide, And I am in my Castle, Lord of all; My faithful groom is standing in the hall To doff my shining robe, while servitors, And cringing chamberlains beside the doors Waving their gilded wands, obsequious wait, ...
— The International Monthly, Volume 2, No. 4, March, 1851 • Various

... above the surge he speeds. As though even now their prey they could destroy, They hasten to their sire with screams of joy, On swollen necks wagging their beaks, they cry; He slowly wins at last a lofty rock, Shelters beneath his drooping wing his flock, And, a sad fisher, gazes on the sky. Adown his open breast the blood flows there; Vainly he searched the ocean's deepest part, The sea was empty and the shore was bare, And for all nourishment he brings his heart. Sad, silent, on the stone, he gives his brood His father-entrails ...
— The Poems of Emma Lazarus - Vol. II. (of II.), Jewish Poems: Translations • Emma Lazarus

... wields a noisy pen Adown the pane, Wet splashes leaving, blots of strange white ink, Blunders ...
— Forty Centuries of Ink • David N. Carvalho

... there was a rustling on the stairway, and she re-entered the room, all sheeny white in lustrous satin. Behind the gauzy veil that fell from the coronal of dark brown hair adown the shoulders her face shone with a look he had never seen in it. It was no longer the mirthful, self-reliant girl who stood before him, but the shrinking, trustful bride. The flashing, imperious expression that so well became her bold beauty at other times had given place to a shy ...
— Dr. Heidenhoff's Process • Edward Bellamy

... A moment gazed adown the dale, A moment snuffed the tainted gale, A moment listened to the cry, That thickened as the chase drew nigh; Then, as the headmost foe appeared, With one brave bound the copse he cleared, And, stretching forward ...
— The Spy • James Fenimore Cooper

... stayed her flight; (Full fain were they the maid had died!) She dropped adown her prison's height On strands of linen featly tied. And so she passed the garden-side With loose-leaved roses sweetly set, And dainty daisies, dark beside The fair white feet ...
— Aucassin and Nicolete • Andrew Lang

... ways Fit not your days," Said he, the man of measuring eye; "I must even fashion as my rule declares, To wit: Give space (since life ends unawares) To hale a coffined corpse adown the stairs; ...
— Wessex Poems and Other Verses • Thomas Hardy

... throw myself into the stream and not die a slow death in this pit." Thereupon he called up his courage and gathering up his skirts, cast himself into the water, and it bore him along with force exceeding and carrying him under the earth, stayed not till it brought him out into a deep Wady, adown which ran a great river, that welled up from under the ground. When he found himself on the face of earth, he abode dazed and a-swoon all that day; after which he came to himself and rising, fared on along that valley; and he ceased not his wayfare, praising Almighty Allah the while, ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... graceful, when it pleased him, smooth and still As the mute Swan that floats adown the stream, Or on the waters of th' unruffled lake Anchored her placid beauty. Not a leaf That flutters on the bough more light than he, And not a flower that droops in the green shade, ...
— Famous Reviews • Editor: R. Brimley Johnson

... come to Trent, That smote the flank of Adige, through some stay Sinking beneath it, or by earthquake rent; For from the summit, where of old it lay, Plainwards the broken rock unto the feet Of one above it might afford some way; Such path adown this precipice ...
— Modern Painters, Volume IV (of V) • John Ruskin

... scenes afar remove, And hide my shuddering head Where Nature doth in field and grove Her fairer pageant spread: There will I meditating lie 'Mid summer's calm delights,— But thou wilt walk adown the High My Tityrus,—in Tights. . ...
— The Casual Ward - academic and other oddments • A. D. Godley

... to Lettermore When white sea-trout are on the run, When purple glows between the rocks About Lord Dudley's fishing box Adown the road to Lettermore, And wide ...
— Georgian Poetry 1918-19 • Various

... mother looked out, so kind and so true, Adown where the rushes and lily-pads grew; They looked very gay, As they paddled away, With their bright, yellow backs, on the ...
— Our Young Folks at Home and Abroad • Various

... royal pair. Here, too, are dishes of china-ware, fit to be the dining set of those same princely personages, when they make a regal banquet in the stateliest ball of their palace, full five feet high, and behold their nobles feasting adown the long perspective of the table. Betwixt the king and queen should sit my little Annie, the prettiest fairy of them all. Here stands a turbaned Turk, threatening us with his sabre, like an ugly heathen as he is. And next a Chinese mandarin, who nods his head at Annie and myself. ...
— Little Annie's Ramble (From "Twice Told Tales") • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... stream, Adown a rough ravine, The lamp still in his hand By friends above is seen; And friends beyond can see him come, His lamp reveals him through ...
— Favourite Welsh Hymns - Translated into English • Joseph Morris

... lead me bravely on Adown your alley-way, and run before Among the roses crowding up the lawn And ...
— Riley Farm-Rhymes • James Whitcomb Riley

... [of] the Assumption;[12] And to Harflete [Harfleur] they took the way And mustered fair before the town. Our King his banner there did 'splay, With standards bright and many [a] pennon: And there he pitched his tent adown; Full well broidered with armory gay. First our comely King's tent with the crown, And all ...
— Fifteenth Century Prose and Verse • Various

... feet. Pitiful heavens! The little coonskin cap! The next instant the dog had flung him sheer over the brink of the steep, and now, in a succession of huge leaps from ledge to ledge, was making his zig-zag way adown its sides, till, in the forest shadows far below, he disappeared. One moment more and his bark came ringing joyfully up to his friends—the sweetest, welcomest sound that had ever greeted ...
— The Red Moccasins - A Story • Morrison Heady

... by law of his creation Creates in one the happy twain; Hand and heart they are united As they pass adown ...
— The Gospel Day • Charles Ebert Orr

... blow of mighty sword and axe, turned aside by the strength of his mail, and glancing adown the surface, had swept from its path the fretted rust, and the glorious steel had answered the kindly blow with the thanks of returning light. These streaks and spots made his armour look like the floor of a forest in the sunlight. His ...
— Phantastes - A Faerie Romance for Men and Women • George MacDonald

... in the crowded thoroughfares of an overgrown city, where every grade of poverty and wealth, of vice and virtue, meet the eye, mingling as they pass along—where splendid royalty is carried quicker than the clouds adown the road which palsied hunger scarce can cross for lack of strength—where lovely forms, and faces pure as angels' in their innocent expression, are met and tainted on the path by unwomanly immodesty and bare licentiousness—amongst ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 54, No. 335, September 1843 • Various

... round without a sound— The maidens hold high revel; In sinful mood, insanely gay, True spinsters spin adown the way From duty to the devil! They laugh, they sing, and—ting-a-ling! Their bells go all the morning; Their lanterns bright bestar the night Pedestrians a-warning. With lifted hands Miss Charlotte stands, Good-Lording and O-mying, Her rheumatism forgotten quite, Her ...
— The Devil's Dictionary • Ambrose Bierce

... play amid the trees In bosky groves, while from the vivid sky The sun's gold arrows fleck the fields at noon, Where weary cattle to their slumber hie. How sweet the music of the purling rill, Trickling adown the grassy hill! While dreamy fancies come to give repose When the first ...
— The Upward Path - A Reader For Colored Children • Various

... Chamberlain called the Castrato and charged him to do accordingly; so he replied, "I hear and I obey;" and he took his pages with him and went out in search of the Stoker till he found him in the rear of the caravan, girthing his ass and preparing for flight. The tears were running adown his cheeks, out of fear for his life and grief for his separation from Zau al-Makan; and he was saying to himself, "Indeed, I warned him for the love of Allah, but he would not listen to me; Oh would I knew what is become of him!" Ere he had done speaking ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 2 • Richard F. Burton

... have you, Mistress Rose!" said Mr Underhill, with another hearty laugh. "It shall scantly be Newgate again, metrusteth: the rather, since there is no Queen Mary to thrust adown your throats—thank the Lord for that and all other His mercies. He that we may speak of is no Papist, whatso else; but I mistake greatly, Robin, if somewhat the same matter shall not come o'er again, should it please God to do a ...
— Clare Avery - A Story of the Spanish Armada • Emily Sarah Holt

... he knew, and strove to meet; In vain he strove to crawl, and kiss his feet; Yet (all he could) his tail, his ears, his eyes. Salute his master, and confess his joys. Soft pity touched the mighty master's soul; Adown his cheek a tear unhidden stole, Stole unperceived: he turned his head and dried The drop ...
— Voices for the Speechless • Abraham Firth

... with winter's tales about the fire: tales that are singularly apposite and characteristic, not only of the old life, but of the very constitution of built nature in that part, and singularly well qualified to add horror to horror, when the wind pipes around the tall lands, and hoots adown arched passages, and the far-spread wilderness of city lamps keeps quavering and flaring in ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition - Vol. 1 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... sat, and sat at ease; The statue 'gan a gracious conversation, And (waving to the foe a salutation) Sail'd with her wondering happy proteges Gayly adown the wide Borysthenes, Until they came unto some friendly nation. And when the heathen had at length grown shy of Their conquest, she one day came ...
— Ballads • William Makepeace Thackeray

... I come," whispered Roger hoarse and eager, as the friar turned slow-footed to follow the others adown the slippery stair, "beseech thee, lord, thy man am I, twice sworn to thee till death, so suffer ...
— Beltane The Smith • Jeffery Farnol

... longer street, up which a clumsy steam tram, vomiting smoke and sparks, made its clangorous way, and adown which one saw the greasy brilliance of shop fronts and the naphtha flares of hawkers' barrows dripping fire into the night. A hazy movement of people swayed along that road, and we heard the voice of an itinerant preacher from a waste place between the houses. You cannot see these things ...
— In the Days of the Comet • H. G. Wells

... over all, of purest gold was spread A trail of ivy in his native hue; For the rich metal was so colored That he who did not well avised it view Would surely deem it to be ivy true; Low his lascivious arms adown did creep That themselves dipping in the silver dew Their fleecy flowers they tenderly did steep, Which drops of crystal seemed ...
— Among My Books • James Russell Lowell

... her corner; she was angry because Felicity would not let her make the rusks, and also, perhaps, a little vexed because she could not charm Great-aunt Eliza with her golden voice and story-telling gift. Felix and I looked at each other and wished ourselves out in the hill field, careering gloriously adown its gleaming crust. ...
— The Golden Road • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... you? I would fain That earthly greatness you may gain; But if that guerdon is not sent, Be with some humble lot content; And let this truth be understood— Few can be great, all may be good. Power, pomp, ambition, envy, pride, Wrecked barks adown life's stream may glide, Ruined by some fierce passion throe, E'er, reckless, o'er Time's brink they go; But if fair virtue grasps the helm, Nor storm ...
— Young Americans Abroad - Vacation in Europe: Travels in England, France, Holland, - Belgium, Prussia and Switzerland • Various

... further uplifting of their hair to satisfy me that the others had been served in like manner; the red stream still trickling adown their necks was ...
— The War Trail - The Hunt of the Wild Horse • Mayne Reid

... "Athwart the moor, adown the hill, Across the world away! The path is long for happy hearts That sing to greet the day, My love, That sing to ...
— Salute to Adventurers • John Buchan

... Trojan women, weeping, Sit ranged in many a length'ning row; Their heedless locks, dishevelled, sweeping Adown the wan cheeks worn with woe. No festive sounds that peal along, Their mournful dirge can overwhelm; Through hymns of joy one sorrowing song, Commingled, wails the ruined realm. "Farewell, beloved shores!" it said: "From home afar behold us torn, ...
— Mosaics of Grecian History • Marcius Willson and Robert Pierpont Willson

... aloft and sail adown, And motion neither slow nor swift, With dark-brown hull and shadow brown, Half-way between two skies adrift, The barque went ...
— The Mistress of the Manse • J. G. Holland

... were in dainty sunshine and shadow, every undulation, every ridge and hollow, softly marked out. With what wonderful sharp outline the mountain edges rose against the bright sky; how wonderful soft the changes of shade and colour adown their sloping sides; what brilliant little ripples of water rolled up to the pebbles at Elizabeth's feet. She stood and looked at it all, at one thing and the other, half dazzled with the beauty; until she recollected herself, and with a deep sighful expression of thoughts and wishes ...
— Hills of the Shatemuc • Susan Warner

... side. There awhile shall we abide, Sitting low down in the porch By that image with the torch: Thy one white hand laid upon The black pillar that was won From the far-off Indian mine; And my hand nigh touching thine, But not touching; and thy gown Fair with spring-flowers cast adown From thy bosom and thy brow. There the south-west wind shall blow Through thine hair to reach my cheek, As thou sittest, nor mayst speak, Nor mayst move the hand I kiss For the very depth of bliss; Nay, nor turn thine eyes to me. Then desire of the great ...
— Poems By The Way & Love Is Enough • William Morris

... but a day since at twilight, low humming, I rocked him to sleep with his cheek upon mine, While Robby, the four-year old, watched for the coming Of father, adown the street's indistinct line. ...
— War Poetry of the South • Various

... suns, the stars above us Gaze adown with burning glow; Fill the lilies' cups gigantic With their ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VI. • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... where the fissure ends at Revaillon is an opening like a vast yawning mouth, the roof of which forms an almost perfect dome. Adown this a stream trickles towards the end of summer, but plunges madly and with a frightful roar in winter and spring. The steep sides of the narrow ravine are densely wooded, and the light is very dim at the bottom when the sun is not overhead. ...
— Wanderings by southern waters, eastern Aquitaine • Edward Harrison Barker

... and raised his rifle. With single movement the two boatmen swung the canoe broadside and held it. The Fremonter sent eagle glance adown his leveled barrel—the rifle cracked and puffed a little waft of smoke. "Spat!" sounded the bullet. The huge snake began to writhe and twist, fairly shaking the tree; then fold by fold it issued, in a horrid ...
— Gold Seekers of '49 • Edwin L. Sabin

... day this child began to cry, Till in his father's barme (lap) adown he lay; And said, 'Farewell, father, I muste die,' And kiss'd his father, and died the ...
— Stories from the Italian Poets: With Lives of the Writers, Volume 1 • Leigh Hunt

... of Life's long dream Flow gently onward to its end, With many a floweret gay, Adown its willowy way: May no sigh vex, no care perplex, My loving ...
— The Game of Logic • Lewis Carroll

... bread; And thus the patriarch, past the desert sands And scant oasis fringed with thirsty green, Be lured toward the love that yearned unseen. So, flung and scattered—ah! by what dear hands?— On the swift-rushing and invisible tide, Small tokens drift adown from far, fair lands, And say to us, who in the desert bide, "Are you athirst? Are there no sheaves to bind? Beloved, here is ...
— Verses • Susan Coolidge

... the child of Such-an-one the tailor?" and the lad answered, "Yes, O my lord, but 'tis long since he died." The Maghrabi,[FN68] the Magician, hearing these words threw himself upon Alaeddin and wound his arms around his neck and fell to bussing him, weeping the while with tears trickling adown his cheeks. But when the lad saw the Moorman's case he was seized with surprise thereat and questioned him, saying, "What causeth thee weep, O my lord: and how camest thou to know my father?" "How canst thou, O my son," replied the Moorman, in a soft voice saddened ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... forward to the plateau. It held its ground for a few minutes, but the bullets whistled so thick, the naked, treeless fields were swept by such a tornado of shot and shell, that it was not long before the panic broke out afresh, sweeping the men adown the slopes, rolling them up as straws are whirled before the wind. And the general, unwilling to abandon his project, ordered ...
— The Downfall • Emile Zola

... herself to the task; but ere her eyes—now of burning, unearthly brilliancy—fell upon the parchment, they darted one rapid, electric glance of ineffable anguish toward Dr. Duras, adown whose cheeks large ...
— Wagner, the Wehr-Wolf • George W. M. Reynolds

... adown the narrow lane, Beside the brook in pasture, And over the wide plain; Tangles in the meadow Where ten million flowers bloom, Draw bee and bird and squirrel, ...
— Our Profession and Other Poems • Jared Barhite

... with pride. The sore throat of a lady's maid would at any time bring a doctor to Seagate Hall; the most commonplace burglary, without any question of jewels, would summon the police inspector thither. After formal salutations, Mr. St. John Raven looked doubtfully adown the corridor. ...
— The Dictator • Justin McCarthy

... gathered the peasant host and them incited she to fight inasmuch as in her lay, but at that same moment rowed the King down the river, then quoth Bergliot: 'Now lack we my kinsman Hakon Ivarson; ne'er would the murderers of Eindrid be rowing there adown the river were ...
— The Sagas of Olaf Tryggvason and of Harald The Tyrant (Harald Haardraade) • Snorri Sturluson

... dear name as text, though bidden by thee, I can not write-I can not speak or think— Alas, I can not feel; for 'tis not feeling, This standing motionless upon the golden Threshold of the wide-open gate of dreams, Gazing, entranced, adown the gorgeous vista, And thrilling as I see, upon the right, Upon the left, and all the way along, Amid empurpled vapors, far away To where ...
— The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 5 (of 5) of the Raven Edition • Edgar Allan Poe

... current In soft torrent Rains adown the gentle girl, As if, drop by drop, should fall, One and all From her necklace ...
— Poems • Victor Hugo

... wealth is told . . ." "As much as that!" you said— "Then the full sum of all my love I'll speak, To the last unit tell the thing you ask . . ." Thereat the gold, in gleaming torrents shed, Fell loose adown each cheek, Hiding you from ...
— A Jongleur Strayed - Verses on Love and Other Matters Sacred and Profane • Richard Le Gallienne

... towards the opposite extremity—and behold! there came swiftly, from the gloom above, similar shadows, which swept hurriedly along the gallery to the right, as if borne involuntarily adown the sides of some invisible stream; and the faces of these spectres were more distinct than those that emerged from the opposite passage; and on some was joy, and on others sorrow—some were vivid with expectation and hope, some unutterably dejected by awe and horror. And so they ...
— The Last Days of Pompeii • Edward George Bulwer-Lytton

... only his head and shoulders appeared through the rotten logs and among the bushes.—A shower coming on, the rapid running of a little barefooted boy, coming up unheard, and dashing swiftly past us, and showing us the soles of his naked feet as he ran adown the path and up the opposite side." In another place he devotes a page to a description of a dog whom he saw running round after its tail; in still another he remarks, in a paragraph by itself—"The aromatic odor of peat-smoke, in the ...
— Hawthorne - (English Men of Letters Series) • Henry James, Junr.

... laughter seemed to set the air a-quivering. Ramiro was lying back in his chair a prey to such a passion of mirth that it swelled the veins of his throat and brow until I thought that they must burst—and, from my soul, I hoped they would. Adown his rugged cheeks two tears were slowly trickling. The Lord Filippo, as presently transpired, had been telling him of the epic I had written in praise of the Lord Giovanni's prowess. Naught would now satisfy that ogre but he must have the epic read, and Filippo, ...
— The Shame of Motley • Raphael Sabatini

... tram-car dips Adown Commercial Road, Till you may see the masts of ships, With all their canvas stowed, Stand o'er the house-tops, high Against blue sky; And thus Romance ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, September 16, 1914 • Various

... thousand English veterans in stately column tread; Their cannon blaze in front and flank, Lord Hay is at their head. Steady they step adown the slopes, steady they mount the hill, Steady they load, steady they fire, moving right onward still, Betwixt the wood and Fontenoy, as through a furnace-blast, Through rampart, trench, and palisade, and bullets showering fast; And on the open plain above they rose ...
— The World's Best Poetry, Volume 8 • Various

... a cup it must have been! It was as large—as large—but, in short, I am afraid to say how immeasurably large it was. To speak within bounds, it was ten times larger than a great mill wheel; and, all of metal as it was, it floated over the heaving surges more lightly than an acorn cup adown the brook. The waves tumbled it onward, until it grazed against the shore, within a short distance of the spot where Hercules ...
— Myths That Every Child Should Know - A Selection Of The Classic Myths Of All Times For Young People • Various

... fair Dame Ingeborg, Whilst tears adown her features pour’d: “Welcome, I say, from the battle fray, Marsk Stig my ...
— Marsk Stig - a ballad - - - Translator: George Borrow • Thomas J. Wise



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