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Accurst   Listen
verb
Accurst, Accursed  past part., adj.  Doomed to destruction or misery; cursed; hence, bad enough to be under the curse; execrable; detestable; exceedingly hateful; as, an accursed deed.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Accurst" Quotes from Famous Books



... sight him much amazde, To see th' unkindly Impes, of heaven accurst, Devoure their dam; on whom while so he gazd, Having all satisfide their bloudy thurst, Their bellies swolne he saw with fulnesse burst, 230 And bowels gushing forth: well worthy end Of such as drunke her ...
— Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book I • Edmund Spenser

... that woman with you, you'll be accurst,' said James. 'I suppose,' he went on, and his tone was, as he afterwards said to his wife with complacency, 'very nasty'—'I suppose you dunno what they're all saying, and what I've come to believe, in this shocking meeting, to ...
— Gone to Earth • Mary Webb

... dost thou seek? who brings thee here thus late? Where has this lovely form reclined till day, While I alone must watch and weep and wait? Where, and on whom hast thou been smiling, say! Out, insolent traitress! canst thou come accurst, And offer to my kiss thy lips' ripe charms? What cravest thou? By what unhallowed thirst Darest thou allure me to thy jaded arms? Avaunt, begone! ghost of my mistress dead, Back to thy grave! avoid the morning's beam! Be my lost youth no more remembered! And ...
— The Poems of Emma Lazarus - Vol. II. (of II.), Jewish Poems: Translations • Emma Lazarus

... we owe to thee, Accurst comparative degree! Thy paltry step can never give Access to the superlative; For he who would the wisest be, Strives to make others wise as he, And never yet was man judged best Who would be better than the rest; So does comparison unkind ...
— Poems with Power to Strengthen the Soul • Various

... face as I saw it, the blood swelling his forehead, and the white wrath round his lips, when he gripped me by the shoulder, saying, in broader Scotch than usual, "Come awa' wi' ye, laddie! I'll no let ye stay. Come awa' oot of this accurst hole. I wonder he doesna think black burning shame of himsel' to stand up before grey-heided men and fill a callant's ears with filth ...
— We and the World, Part II. (of II.) - A Book for Boys • Juliana Horatia Ewing

... I become so monstrous, so disfigured, That nature cannot suffer my approach, Or look me in the face, but stands aghast; And that fair light which gilds this new-made orb, Shorn of his beams, shrinks in? accurst ambition! And thou, black empire of the nether world, How dearly have I bought you! But, 'tis past; I have already gone too far to stop, And must push on my dire revenge, in ruin Of this gay frame, and man, my upstart rival, In ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Volume 5 (of 18) - Amboyna; The state of Innocence; Aureng-Zebe; All for Love • John Dryden

... more remains, that thou on me Shouldst not now satiate thy revengeful thirst? What more (she said) can I bestow on thee Than, what thou seekest not, this life accurst? Thou wast in haste to snatch me from the sea, Where I had ended its sad days, immersed; Because to torture me with further ill Before I die, is yet thy ...
— Orlando Furioso • Lodovico Ariosto

... Rocks they burst: They passed by the Cape unsleeping Of Phineus' sons accurst: They ran by the star-lit bay Upon magic surges sweeping, Where folk on the waves astray Have seen, through the gleaming grey, Ring behind ring, men say, The dance of the old ...
— The Iphigenia in Tauris • Euripides

... The thickest cloud earth ever stretched; That, after Last, returns the First, Though a wide compass round be fetched; That what began best, can't end worst, Nor what God blessed once, prove accurst." ...
— Introduction to Robert Browning • Hiram Corson

... becoming a different thing from the toleration of former times. The toleration of the past consisted very largely in saying, "You are utterly wrong and totally accurst, there is no truth but my truth and that you deny, but it is not my place to destroy you and so I let you go." Nowadays there is a real disposition to accept the qualified nature of one's private certainties. One may have arrived at very definite ...
— Mankind in the Making • H. G. Wells

... on fields accurst, The gray fog fled away; But neither cared to fire the first, For it ...
— Winning a Cause - World War Stories • John Gilbert Thompson and Inez Bigwood

... birth Since God first kneaded man from earth: O, I have cause to know him well, As Ferroe's blacken'd rocks can tell. Who was it did, at Suderoe, The deed no other dar'd to do? Who was it, when the Boff {f:31} had burst, And whelm'd me in its womb accurst— Who was it dash'd amid the wave, With frantic zeal, my life to save? Who was it flung the rope to me? O, who, ...
— Romantic Ballads - translated from the Danish; and Miscellaneous Pieces • George Borrow

... place Along the rock was vacant, as a man Walks near the battlements on narrow wall. For those on th' other part, who drop by drop Wring out their all-infecting malady, Too closely press the verge. Accurst be thou! Inveterate wolf! whose gorge ingluts more prey, Than every beast beside, yet is not fill'd! So bottomless thy maw!—Ye spheres of heaven! To whom there are, as seems, who attribute All change in mortal state, when is the day Of his appearing, for whom fate reserves To chase her hence?—With ...
— The Divine Comedy, Complete - The Vision of Paradise, Purgatory and Hell • Dante Alighieri

... now, behold, what Is warfare wherein honour is not! Rama laments Its dead innocents: Herod breathes: "Sly slaughter Shall rule! Let us, by modes once called accurst, Overhead, under ...
— Moments of Vision • Thomas Hardy

... profound,— A sullen sound that threatens more Than other torrents' louder roar. Ah! they had borne well as they might, Such wrongs as freemen ill can bear; And they had urged both day and night, In fitting words, a freeman's prayer; And when the heart is filled with grief, For wrongs of all true souls accurst, In action it must seek relief, Or else, o'ercharged, it can but burst. Why blame we them, if they oft spake Words that were fitted to awake The soul's high hopes—its noblest parts— The slumbering passions of brave hearts, ...
— Autographs for Freedom, Volume 2 (of 2) (1854) • Various

... spirit and set free my tongue; but I grope in darkness, and my tired arms grasp nothing save delusive shadows. And for ten thousand years, as the sole answer to my cries, as the sole comfort in my agony, I hear astir, over this earth accurst, the despairing sob of impotent agony. For ten thousand years I have cried in infinite space: Truth! Truth! For ten thousand years infinite space keeps answering me: Desire, Desire. O Sibyl forsaken! O mute Pythia! dash then thy head against the rocks of thy cavern, ...
— Selections from the Prose Works of Matthew Arnold • Matthew Arnold

... bare breast the cedar boughs are laid, On his bare breast, dry sedge and odorous gums, Laid ready to receive the sacred spark, And blaze, to herald the ascending sun, Upon his living altar. Round the wretch The inhuman ministers of rites accurst Stand, and expect the signal when to strike The seed of fire. Their Chief, apart from all, ... eastward turns his eyes; For now the hour draws nigh, and speedily He look's to see the first faint dawn of day Break through ...
— The Story of Extinct Civilizations of the West • Robert E. Anderson

... jewels were accurst— With evil omen fraught. You should have known it from the first! This was the truth ...
— Dreams and Days: Poems • George Parsons Lathrop

... mine he was preparing for his enemy will not deny that gunpowder has aptitudes of mischief; and from the point of view of a nigger ordered upon the safety-valve of a racing steamboat, the vapor of water is a thing accurst. Shall we condemn music because the lute makes "lascivious pleasing?" Or poetry because some amorous bard tells in warm rhyme the story of the passions, and Swinburne has had the goodness to make vice offensive with his hymns in its praise? Or sculpture because ...
— The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce, Volume 8 - Epigrams, On With the Dance, Negligible Tales • Ambrose Bierce

... guts of my mountains, looting the beds of my creeks, Them will I take to my bosom, and speak as a mother speaks. I am the land that listens, I am the land that broods; Steeped in eternal beauty, crystalline waters and woods. Long have I waited lonely, shunned as a thing accurst, Monstrous, moody, pathetic, the last of the lands and the first; Visioning camp-fires at twilight, sad with a longing forlorn, Feeling my womb o'er-pregnant with the seed of cities unborn. Wild and wide are my borders, stern as death is my sway, And I wait for the ...
— The Spell of the Yukon • Robert Service

... lie, for I have heard this outlaw is beyond all men wild and fierce and weaveth him demoniac spells and enchantments most accurst, whereby he maketh gate and door and mighty portcullis to ope and yield before his pointed finger, and bolt and bar and massy wall to give him passage when he will, as witness the great keep of Garthlaxton that he did burn with hellish fire. I have heard he doth commonly burn gibbets ...
— Beltane The Smith • Jeffery Farnol

... muttered, "Foe accurst! hast thou dared to seek me first? George of Gorbals, do thy worst—for I swear, O'er thy gory corpse to ride, ere thy sister and my bride, From my undissevered side ...
— The Bon Gaultier Ballads • William Edmonstoune Aytoun

... heads all stooping low, their points all in a row, Like a whirlwind on the trees, like a deluge on the dykes, Our cuirassiers have burst on the ranks of the Accurst, And at a shock have scattered ...
— The Miscellaneous Writings and Speeches of Lord Macaulay, Vol. 3. (of 4) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... glorious band! With FREEDOM'S loud hurra the Andes quake! It swells, like ocean's wave, from land to land— Bless them, our Father! for thy children's sake. They strike the noblest who shall strike the first— Wailing and prostrate, Tyranny accurst, Convulses earth with his fierce agonies; But, if ye strike like ...
— The Emigrant - or Reflections While Descending the Ohio • Frederick William Thomas

... be bound; But, finding these so false, we pass beyond Unto the Love of Loves that never dies. Nay, things that die, cannot assuage the thirst Of souls undying; nor Eternity Serves Time, where all must fade that flourisheth. Sense is not love, but lawlessness accurst: This kills the soul; while our love lifts on high Our friends on earth—higher ...
— Sonnets • Michael Angelo Buonarroti & Tommaso Campanella

... incensed skies, Poor Bishop Judas late repenting dies. The Jews engaged him with a paltry bribe, Amounting hardly to a crown a-tribe; Which though his conscience forced him to restore, (And parsons tell us, no man can do more,) Yet, through despair, of God and man accurst, He lost his bishopric, and hang'd or burst. Those former ages differ'd much from this; Judas betray'd his master with a kiss: But some have kiss'd the gospel fifty times, Whose perjury's the least of all their crimes; Some who can perjure through ...
— The Poems of Jonathan Swift, D.D., Volume I (of 2) • Jonathan Swift

... while, as he spake, athwart and wild she gazed, And here and there her eyeballs rolled, and strayed with silent look His body o'er; and at the last with heart of fire outbroke: "Traitor! no Goddess brought thee forth, nor Dardanus was first Of thine ill race; but Caucasus on spiky crags accurst Begot thee; and Hyrcanian dugs of tigers suckled thee. Why hide it now? why hold me back lest greater evil be? For did he sigh the while I wept? his eyes—what were they moved? Hath he been vanquished unto ...
— The AEneids of Virgil - Done into English Verse • Virgil

... fact, replied the cunning jade; To burn it, quickly William seek fort aid; The tree accurst no longer shall remain; Her will the servant wish'd not to restrain, But soon some workmen brought, who felled the tree; And wondered what the fault our fair could see. Down hew it, cried the lady, that's your task; More concerns you not; folly ...
— The Tales and Novels, Complete • Jean de La Fontaine

... prey upon the human race, whom I hate; because of all the world I alone am so deeply, so terribly accurst!" was the ominously fearful yet ...
— Wagner, the Wehr-Wolf • George W. M. Reynolds

... thou and I the battle try, And set our men aside." "Accurst be he," Earl Piercy said, "By whom ...
— A Bundle of Ballads • Various

... yourselves with the safety of the Republic! I repudiate you all as traitors to our country! I place you all in the same line!" I said to them: "What care I for my reputation! Let France be free, tho my name were accurst! What care I that I am called 'a blood-drinker!'" Well, let us drink the blood of the enemies of humanity, if needful; but let us struggle, let us achieve freedom. Some fear the departure of the commissioners may ...
— Model Speeches for Practise • Grenville Kleiser

... than remorse, and worse a thousand-fold, Than pangs of hunger. 'Tis the thirst of love, The rage and rapture of the ravening dove We name Desire. Ah, pardon! I offend; My fervor blinds me to the withering end Of all good council, and, accurst thereby, I vaunt anew the faults ...
— A Lover's Litanies • Eric Mackay

... Belike from ill deeds done in by-gone lives It hath befall'n, and what I suffer now Is payment of old evils undischarged. Grievous the doom—my palace lost, my lord, My children, kindred; I am torn away From home and love and all, to roam accurst In this plague-haunted waste!" When broke the day, Those which escaped alive, with grievous cries Departed, mourning for their fellows slain. Each one a kinsman or a friend laments— Father or brother, son, or comrade dear. And Damayanti, hearing, weeps anew, Saying: ...
— Hindu Literature • Epiphanius Wilson

... heart Springs quick the thought, wrong may be on his side And right on Carle's. The Pagans [waver now]. The Emperor Carle around him calls his (Franks): "Barons, in God's name, do you stand by me?" Respond the French:—"To ask is an offense. Accurst be he who ...
— La Chanson de Roland • Lon Gautier

... lull. The beacon dies: "Are they out of that strait accurst" But other flames now dawning rise, Not mellowly brilliant like the first, But rolled in ...
— Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War • Herman Melville

... comforts, and, in them, With all my life for them; all sent from him In his remembrance of mee and true love. 95 And looke you tell him, tell him how I lye She kneeles downe at his feete. Prostrate at feet of his accurst misfortune, Pouring my teares out, which shall ever fall, Till I have pour'd for him out ...
— Bussy D'Ambois and The Revenge of Bussy D'Ambois • George Chapman

... aught but the truth—unless that your lordship's credit, my country's profit, or, it may be, some sma' occasion of my ain, made it unnecessary to promulgate the haill veritie,—I say then, as I am a true man, when I saw that puir creature come through the ha', at that ordinary, whilk is accurst (Heaven forgive me for swearing!) of God and man, with his teeth set, and his hands clenched, and his bonnet drawn over his brows like a desperate man, Goblin said to me, 'There goes a dunghill chicken, ...
— The Fortunes of Nigel • Sir Walter Scott

... old man, "and doubtless his adventure is of a nature in line with thy puerile and effeminate teachings. Had he followed my training, without thy accurst priestly interference, he had made an iron-barred nest in Torn for many of the doves of thy damned English nobility. An' thou leave him not alone, he will soon be seeking service in the household ...
— The Outlaw of Torn • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... with her own hard pride, That fair rock knew to guide Where now my life in wreck and ruin drives: Thus too the soul deprives, By theft, my heart, which once so stonelike was, It kept my senses whole, now far dispersed: For mine, O fate accurst! A rock that lifeblood and not iron draws, Whom still i' the flesh a magnet living, sweet, Drags to the fatal shore a certain ...
— The Sonnets, Triumphs, and Other Poems of Petrarch • Petrarch

... thou and I the battell trye, And set our men aside.' 'Accurst be he,' Erle Percy said, 'By ...
— Lyra Heroica - A Book of Verse for Boys • Various

... help me once, but not again! Weary with toiling I was like to swoon. When God let fall milk-porridge 'stead of rain! And I, poor donkey, hadn't brought a spoon! Yes, Heaven had meant to help me, me accurst! I saw my luck but couldn't by it profit! Quickly my brother made a banquet of it— Ate my ...
— Pelle the Conqueror, Complete • Martin Andersen Nexo

... fragrant Fumes, } So pleas'd his Nostrils, till th'Aspirer comes } From offering, to receiving Hecatombs; } And ceasing to adore, to be ador'd. So fell Faiths guide: so loftily he towr'd, Till like th'Ambitious Lucifer accurst, Swell'd to a God, into a ...
— Anti-Achitophel (1682) - Three Verse Replies to Absalom and Achitophel by John Dryden • Elkanah Settle et al.

... with ravings and thoughts insane, So long as we hold In our hands the gold?— The glistening, glittering, ghastly gold That comes at the end of the hunger and cold; That comes at the end of the awful thirst; That comes through the pain and torture accurst Of limbs that are racked and minds o'erthrown, The gold lies there and is all our own, Be we mighty or meek, If we do but seek. For the hunger is sweet and the cold is fair To the man whose riches are past compare; And the ...
— Cobwebs from a Library Corner • John Kendrick Bangs

... that rich rain, Which, as it drops, clears all again. O what kind visits daily pass 'Twixt Thy great self and such poor grass: With what sweet looks doth Thy love shine On those low violets of Thine, While the tall tulip is accurst, And crowns imperial die with thirst! O give me still those secret meals, Those rare repasts which Thy love deals! Give me that joy, which none can grieve, And which in all griefs doth relieve! This is the portion Thy child begs; Not that of rust, ...
— Poems of Henry Vaughan, Silurist, Volume II • Henry Vaughan

... lad! He came to me for sanctuary, and I had betrayed my trust. How could I look in the face of my son again—in the eye of my girl? Those clear eyes would read my secret, and I should be as one accurst." ...
— The Bag of Diamonds • George Manville Fenn

... for which men hungered and had thirst, And dying were loth to die before it came, Is it indeed upon thee? and the lame Late foot of vengeance on thy trace accurst For years insepulchred and crimes inhearsed, For days marked red or black with blood or shame, Hath it outrun thee to tread out thy name? This scourge, this hour, is this indeed the worst? O clothed and crowned with curses, canst thou tell? Have thy dead whispered to thee what ...
— Two Nations • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... secret; live to feel the look of a young child's eyes a shame to him; live to envy every peasant whose bread has not been bought with tainted coin; live to hear ever in his path the stealing step of haunting retribution; live to see his brethren pass by him as a thing accurst; live to listen in his age to white-haired men, who once had been his comrades, tell to the youth about them the unforgotten story of his shame. Make him live thus ...
— Wisdom, Wit, and Pathos of Ouida - Selected from the Works of Ouida • Ouida

... and his wailings were heard, By the Lord God of Hosts; whose vengeance deferred, Gathers force by delay, and with fury will burst, On his impious oppressor—the tyrant accurst! ...
— The Liberty Minstrel • George W. Clark

... oh! of all tortures That torture the worst Has abated—the terrible Torture of thirst For the naphthaline river Of Passion accurst:— I have drank of a water That ...
— The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 5 (of 5) of the Raven Edition • Edgar Allan Poe

... great! the glorious! the august! Each bearing on his brow a crown of fire, Sat stern and silent. Nimrod he was there, First King the mighty hunter; and that Chief Who did belie his mother's fame, that so He might be called young Ammon. In this court Caesar was crown'd, accurst liberticide; And he who murdered Tully, that cold villain, Octavius, tho' the courtly minion's lyre Hath hymn'd his praise, tho' Maro sung to him, And when Death levelled to original clay The royal carcase, FLATTERY, fawning low, Fell at his feet, ...
— Poems, 1799 • Robert Southey

... His back to the south, which had crucified Him, and extending His arms on the Cross to bless and embrace the north. He seemed to be withdrawing His favours from the east, 'to bestow them on the west. Hence, if any region is accurst and inhabited by Satan, it is the ...
— The Cathedral • Joris-Karl Huysmans

... than mad. My own hope is, a sun will pierce The thickest cloud earth ever stretched; That after Last returns the First, Though a wide compass round be fetched; That what began best can't end worst, Nor what God blessed once prove accurst. ...
— Familiar Quotations • John Bartlett

... I the battell trye, And set our men aside. Accurst bee he, Erle Percy sayd, By whome this ...
— Book of Old Ballads • Selected by Beverly Nichols

... Euphrasia's voice Be hush'd to silence, when a father dies? Shall not the monster hear his deeds accurst? Shall he not tremble, when a daughter comes, Wild with her griefs, and terible with wrongs; Fierce in despair, all nature in her cause Alarm'd and rous'd with horror? Melanthon come; my wrongs will lend me force; The weakness of my sex is gone; this arm Feels tenfold strength; this arm shall ...
— The Grecian Daughter • Arthur Murphy

... an evil hour 'Gainst Nature's voice seduced to deeds accurst! Once Fortune's minion now thou feel'st her power; Wrath's vial on thy lofty head hath burst. In Wit, in Genius, as in Wealth the first, How wondrous bright thy blooming morn arose! But thou wert smitten with th' unhallowed thirst Of Crime unnamed, and thy sad noon must close In scorn ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Vol. 7. - Poetry • George Gordon Byron

... warning spectres meet In ghastly circle round its shadowy seat! Yet still the Tempter murmurs in his ear The maddening taunt he cannot choose but hear "Meanest of slaves, by gods and men accurst, He who is second when he might be first Climb with bold front the ladder's topmost round, Or chain thy creeping footsteps to the ground!" Illustrious Dupe! Have those majestic eyes Lost their proud fire for such a vulgar prize? Art thou the last of all mankind to know That party-fights are won ...
— The Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Complete • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... shall live hated, be blasphem'd, Seis'd on by Force, judg'd, and to Death condemn'd, A shameful and accurst, nail'd to the Cross By his own Nation, slain for bringing Life; But to the Cross He nails thy Enemies The Law that is against thee, and the sins Of all Mankind, with him there crucified, Never to hurt them more, ...
— The Theater (1720) • Sir John Falstaffe

... down into the vaults, where these forgotten creatures, with recollections of the world outside—of wives, friends, children, brothers—starved to death, and made the stones ring with their unavailing groans. But, the thrill I felt on seeing the accurst wall below, decayed and broken through, and the sun shining in through its gaping wounds, was like a sense of victory ...
— Seeing Europe with Famous Authors, Volume 3 • Various

... there be million hearts accurst, where no sweet sunbursts shine, And there be million hearts athirst for Love's immortal wine; This world is full of beauty, as other worlds above, And if we did our duty, it ...
— The Old Helmet, Volume II • Susan Warner

... the cabin impressed them all unfavourably, and the mutinous sounds again broke forth. All pirates are superstitious; and Cookson cried, 'They do say the surest sign a ship's accurst is when there's one on board more than can ...
— Peter and Wendy • James Matthew Barrie

... genius soars unbounded to the skies? And shall a Bufo's most polluted name Stain her bright tablet of untainted fame? Shall his disgraceful name with theirs be join'd, Who wish'd and wrought the welfare of their kind? 60 His name, accurst, who, leagued with——[4] and Hell, Labour'd to rouse, with rude and murderous yell, Discord the fiend, to toss rebellion's brand, To whelm in rage and woe a guiltless land: To frustrate wisdom's, virtue's ...
— The Poetical Works of Beattie, Blair, and Falconer - With Lives, Critical Dissertations, and Explanatory Notes • Rev. George Gilfillan [Ed.]

... the gorge where three ways met, Bedewed by these my hands with mine own blood From whence I sprang—have ye forgotten me? Or doth some memory haunt you of the deeds I did before you, and went on to do Worse horrors here? O marriage twice accurst! That gave me being, and then again sent forth Fresh saplings springing from the selfsame seed, To amaze men's eyes and minds with dire confusion Of father, brother, son, bride, mother, wife, Murder of parents, and all shames that are! Silence alone befits ...
— The Seven Plays in English Verse • Sophocles

... the raging Sea, It's rigid veynes, from thy rough bosome drew; Marble, from those rocks hewne, Deucalion threw Over Gaetulian fields: Megara first Fix'd th'in thy regall seat, on thee accurst Then Tisiphon the Scepter did bestow, And set the Diadem on thy savage brow: And as thy princely Ivory, of late Thou proudly lean'dst upon, close by thee sate With stately columnes prop'd, fell tyrannie, Her Ensignes, ...
— The Odes of Casimire, Translated by G. Hils • Mathias Casimire Sarbiewski

... roved, and then All the Patriot rose in his soul, and he thought Upon Wales, and her glories, and all he'd been taught Of her Heroes of old, So brave and so bold,— Of her Bards with long beards, and harps mounted in gold Of King Edward the First, Of memory accurst; And the scandalous manner in which he behaved, Killing Poets by dozens, With their uncles and cousins, Of whom not one in fifty had ever been shaved— Of the Court Ball, at which, by a lucky mishap, Owen Tudor fell into Queen Katherine's ...
— The Humourous Poetry of the English Language • James Parton

... The salt creek may forget the ocean; If I forget The heart whence flows my heart's bright motion, May I sink meanlier than the worst Abandoned, outcast, crushed, accurst, If I forget. ...
— The Woodlanders • Thomas Hardy

... a malady— (Striking his heart and forehead.) And here, and here, A mortal malady.—I am accurst: All nature curses me, and in my heart Thy curse is fixed; the truth must be laid bare. It must be told, and borne. I am the man, (Abused, betrayed, but how it matters not) Presumptuous above all that ever breathed, Who, casting as I thought ...
— The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth - Volume 1 of 8 • Edited by William Knight

... it with Sir Hubert? —Beggarly language! I could burst For impotence of effort: Those who made thee were accurst! Dumb men were gods were all dumb. But go on, ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 56, Number 347, September, 1844 • Various

... it needed that incarnate vice, In human mould, in the same image made, Trampled with iron hoof his fellow man, Virtue's chastised development to aid. For whence was Vice derived? Ere life began, For His own offspring could their Maker trace Their loathsome office, and beneath his ban Place them, accurst (creating to debase), And doom as fuel for the flames that test A favoured few, elect by ...
— Old-Fashioned Ethics and Common-Sense Metaphysics - With Some of Their Applications • William Thomas Thornton

... tears. 'Alas!' he sobbed, 'this snaps the last link that bound me to humanity. My friend disowns—he insults me. I am indeed accurst.' ...
— The Dynamiter • Robert Louis Stevenson and Fanny van de Grift Stevenson

... and the sorrow, the guilt and the punishment, out from all our sins, and pour them into one chalice, and mingle them with an infinite wrath, and make the wicked drink of all the vengeance, and force it down their unwilling throats with the violence of devils and accurst spirits. ...
— The World's Great Sermons, Vol. 2 (of 10) • Grenville Kleiser

... mercy! let me die, Adam out of hell to buy, And his kin who are accurst.' 'Son, what use have I for breath? Sorrow wasteth me to death— Let ...
— The Letters of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Volume II • Elizabeth Barrett Browning

... "Oooo!" I cried, hugging her, and then, you know, there was no course open to a man of honour but to offer marriage and make a lady of her. I proposed: she accepted me, and here I am, eternally tied to this accurst insignia, if I'm to keep my promise! Isn't that a sacrifice, friend H.? There's no course open to me. The poor girl is madly in love. She called me a "rattle!" As ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... 118. 5 But haughty sinners God will hate, The proud shall die accurst; The sons of falsehood and deceit Are trodden to ...
— The Psalms of David - Imitated in the Language of The New Testament - And Applied to The Christian State and Worship • Isaac Watts

... to the wretched person capable of this daring profanation. The name of the first murderer—the accurst of God—brought into the same aspect image with that of the Saviour of the World! We are scarcely satisfied that even to quote such passages may not be criminal. The subject is too repulsive for us to proceed ...
— Early Reviews of English Poets • John Louis Haney

... last returns the first, though a wide compass round be fetched; What began best can't end worst, nor what God once blest prove accurst. ...
— Morality as a Religion - An exposition of some first principles • W. R. Washington Sullivan

... accurst, with cursing sealed and signed, Heeds not what storms about it burn and burst: No fear more fearful than its own may ...
— A Century of Roundels • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... over curious brain That gave that plot a birth, accurst this womb That after did conceive ...
— A King, and No King • Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher

... steel is rough and brown, Strikes the alcaliph on his helm's golden mount; Flowers and stones fall clattering to the ground, Slices his head, to th'small teeth in his mouth; So brandishes his blade and flings him down; After he says: "Pagan, accurst be thou! Thou'lt never say that Charles forsakes me now; Nor to thy wife, nor any dame thou'st found, Thou'lt never boast, in lands where thou wast crowned, One pennyworth from me thou'st taken out, Nor damage wrought on ...
— The Song of Roland • Anonymous

... of Love, which him at first Made of meere love, and after liked well, Seeing him lie like creature long accurst In that deep horor of despeyred hell, 130 Him, wretch, in doole* would let no lenger dwell, But cast** out of that bondage to redeeme, And pay the price, all@ were his debt extreeme. [* Doole, pain.] [** ...
— The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 5 • Edmund Spenser

... "Accurst of his heart," said jolly Robin, "That a butcher doth deny; I will go with you, my brethren true, As fast ...
— A Collection of Ballads • Andrew Lang

... make Me her vices quite forsake? Or her faults to me made known, Make me think that I have none? Be she of the most accurst, And deserve the name of worst! If she be not so to me, What care I how bad ...
— The Book of Humorous Verse • Various

... thou hear, young Marshal Stig, Of a dreadful wrong I must complain, The King accurst has my body forc’d And my matron honour from ...
— Marsk Stig - a ballad - - - Translator: George Borrow • Thomas J. Wise

... nere haue blusht, th[e] she does make a vow though al the Gods of both worlds had th[e] seen She raveth that she euer lou'd til now, that she might worthily ha bin loues Queene. wel, wel (quoth she) thou hast reueng'd the spight which from my accurst Sons bow did fowly light On thy faire Mother, O immortall boy, Though thou be faire, tis ...
— Seven Minor Epics of the English Renaissance (1596-1624) • Dunstan Gale

... pavement!—the sunshine retires; And I wish, oh, I wish that my tongue dared to utter The thoughts that this changeable weather inspires. Back, back to my rooms; I am drenched and disgusted; In thick boots and an ulster I'll tempt it again; And accurst be the hour when I foolishly trusted The barometer's index, ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 102, May 7, 1892 • Various

... grow up to be thy prey, New slaves throng round, and those who crouched at first, Though oft they threaten, leave not for a day Thy roof accurst. ...
— Horace • Theodore Martin

... scarcely can believe the blissful change, 15 He weeps perchance who wept not while accurst; Never again will he approach the range Infected by that evil spell now burst: Poor wretch! who once hath paced that dolent city Shall pace it often, doomed beyond all pity, 20 With horror ever deepening from ...
— The City of Dreadful Night • James Thomson

... did she keep the place To open the doors accurst, And every soul that her tear-drops knew, It would neither ...
— The Story and Song of Black Roderick • Dora Sigerson

... acceptance here. For first the old man of the mountain will never have anything to do with sorcery and witchcraft, because he hates every kind of superstition, even that which is pious and unavoidable, much more then one of this sort, which he must needs hold to be utterly accurst. Besides you don't even know in what way the thief goes to work, so as to take proper measures ...
— The Old Man of the Mountain, The Lovecharm and Pietro of Abano - Tales from the German of Tieck • Ludwig Tieck

... covering his face with his hands, "that I am of all living things the most accurst!" Then with a cry of horror and anguish he fled from the room and ...
— Master of His Fate • J. Mclaren Cobban

... went on the Dane, perceiving that he had scored a point, and that the laugh was no longer against him, "I van hab nuzzing vor to do mit ze dreazure of ze boocaneer, and I vas hopes not vor to zee it a gains. It vas accurst, as I vas zay, vor ze boocaneer zemselves vas not able vor to vind it after zay vas burit it; and den, ven Cap'en Shackzon vinds it, he vas also murter't, as the schlave vas, and his crew vas murter't zemselves! Ze boocaneer dreazure vas accurst and bringt goot to no beebles. And ...
— The Island Treasure • John Conroy Hutcheson

... indeed!' Unskilled the fowler who his snare reveals: If at the bait I snatch—my doom is sealed: Too plain, too coarse, this web for any fly— Shall I this spider hail in my fatuity? His wrath is wrath arranged, his generous fire is nursed, That I, at Decius' hand, may meet the doom accurst, If I should pardon grant—that grace my crime would be, For he the spoil would reap of my credulity. No simpleton am I, each promise to believe, Words—oaths—are but the tools wherewith all men deceive; Too oft escaped am I to be so lightly ...
— Polyuecte • Pierre Corneille

... kin bear thou sad tidings of our plight; * From doom th' All-wise decreed shall none of men take flight: Low art thou laid, O brother! strewn upon the stones, * With face that mirrors moon when shining brightest bright! Good sooth, it is a day accurst, thy slaughter-day * Shivering thy spear that won the day in many a fight! Now thou be slain no rider shall delight in steed, * Nor man child shall the breeding woman bring to light. This morn Hammad uprose and foully murthered thee, ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... Bride of the Sun, for if I suffered this, certainly the curse of the Sun would fall upon me and upon my people. He who lays a hand upon her I will strive to slay"—here he looked at me with meaning—"because I must or be accurst. Take all else, but let the lady Quilla be. What the Sun ...
— The Virgin of the Sun • H. R. Haggard

... patriot tongue Belying the foul heart! Who was it urg'd Friendly to tyrants that accurst decree, 40 Whose influence brooding o'er this hallowed hall, Has chill'd each tongue to silence? Who destroyed The freedom of debate, and carried through The fatal law, that doom'd the delegates, Unheard before their ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Vol I and II • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... the bulls by pair Plunge panting through the dust, Like things accurst they die of thirst The ...
— War Rhymes • Abner Cosens

... spend his news may hear,— And who but, far or near, the sou affords To learn the worst of foreigners and lords! So comes the Pressman's heaven on earth, wherein One touch of hatred proves the whole world kin— "Our rulers are the best, and theirs the worst, Our cause is always just and theirs accurst, Our troops are heroes, hirelings theirs or slaves, Our diplomats but children, theirs but knaves, Our Press for independence justly prized, Theirs bought or blind, inspired or subsidized. For the world's progress what was ever ...
— Poems: New and Old • Henry Newbolt

... there: From fire and water, Converse, and all things common, be he banished. But for the murderer's self, unfound by man, Find him, ye powers celestial and infernal! And the same fate, or worse than Laius met, Let be his lot: His children be accurst; His wife and kindred, all of ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Vol. 6 (of 18) - Limberham; Oedipus; Troilus and Cressida; The Spanish Friar • John Dryden

... scent of an old and melancholy house. Why, then,—while so much of the soil around him was bestrewn with the virgin forest leaves,—why should Colonel Pyncheon prefer a site that had already been accurst? ...
— The House of the Seven Gables • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... you may take it from me, That of all the afflictions accurst With which a man's saddled And hampered and addled, A diffident nature's the worst. Though clever as clever can be— A Crichton of early romance— You must stir it and stump it, And blow your own trumpet, Or, trust me, you ...
— Bab Ballads and Savoy Songs • W. S. Gilbert

... yourselves to screen, The practice is accurst, It is condemned by God and man, The pious ...
— Bundling; Its Origin, Progress and Decline in America • Henry Reed Stiles

... it would have gone through as smoothly as to-night. The drums of jeopardy. Well, that phase of the game was done with. He had held up this raid so that he might be on hand to search Karlov; and until now he had forgotten the drums. Accurst! They were accurst. The death of Stefani Gregor would always be on ...
— The Drums Of Jeopardy • Harold MacGrath

... differentiation and allocation, these defences of the beautiful and new, and of the temples enshrining them, shall be like the walls round a new sanctuary. We shall thereby protect ourselves from the encroaching commercial machine, its dwarfing ethics, mean postulates, and accurst conventions, and we shall rear within the walls all the beautiful that the outside world says does not exist. We shall find a whole new world of those who despise the honours and prizes of the commercial machine, and who care not for the ...
— A Tramp's Sketches • Stephen Graham

... the dawning, as day was breaking, the might of Grendel to men was known; then after wassail was wail uplifted, loud moan in the morn. The mighty chief, atheling excellent, unblithe sat, labored in woe for the loss of his thanes, when once had been traced the trail of the fiend, spirit accurst: too cruel that sorrow, too long, too loathsome. Not late the respite; with night returning, anew began ruthless murder; he recked no whit, firm in his guilt, of the feud and crime. They were easy to find who elsewhere sought in room remote their rest at night, bed in ...
— Beowulf • Anonymous

... again and yet again, Would vainly seek to move my stubborn heart If slander were, and wit were not, an art. The ill-bred and illiterate can lie As fast as you, and faster far than I. Shall I compete, then, in a strife accurst Where Allen Forman is an easy first, And where the second prize is rightly flung To Charley Shortridge or to Mike ...
— Black Beetles in Amber • Ambrose Bierce

... keep the gates of Greece, Ye saints of "safety first!" Twixt Thessaly and Locris when Leonidas' thousand men Died scornful of the proffered peace Of Xerxes the accurst? Watch ye have kept, ward ye have kept, But watch and ward were vain If love and gratitude have slept While ...
— The Eye of Zeitoon • Talbot Mundy

... was since first He offered to the race of men His sovran boon, As one accurst They nailed Him to the jibbet then, And while they mocked Him for their mirth He smiled, and from the hill of pain To all the hating tribes of earth Held forth His ...
— 'Hello, Soldier!' - Khaki Verse • Edward Dyson

... me: now I dare not say 65 I have one friend alive; thou wouldst disprove me. Who should be trusted now, when one's right hand Is perjured to the bosom? Proteus, I am sorry I must never trust thee more, But count the world a stranger for thy sake. 70 The private wound is deepest: O time most accurst, 'Mongst all foes that a friend ...
— Two Gentlemen of Verona - The Works of William Shakespeare [Cambridge Edition] [9 vols.] • William Shakespeare

... Time Who seemed to halt in horror, when I stained my manhood by a crime, With steady step moves on again, And through the black appalling night, That walled me in a gloom accurst, The wonder of the morning light ...
— Poems of Experience • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... of Tarutino first it flits; Thence swerving, strikes at old Jaroslawitz; The which, accurst ...
— The Dynasts - An Epic-Drama Of The War With Napoleon, In Three Parts, - Nineteen Acts, And One Hundred And Thirty Scenes • Thomas Hardy

... must melt in gloom, Great WORTH himself must die, Before the Sex again assume EVE'S sweet simplicity! I saw a vision in my sleep, Which made me bow my head and weep As one aghast, accurst! Was it a spook before me past? Of women I beheld the last, As ADAM ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 104, February 11, 1893 • Various

... thief of fire from heaven,[260] Wilt thou withstand the shock? And share with him, the unforgiven, His vulture and his rock! Foredoomed by God—by man accurst,[iu] And that last act, though not thy worst, The very Fiend's arch mock;[261] He in his fall preserved his pride, And, if a mortal, had ...
— The Works Of Lord Byron, Vol. 3 (of 7) • Lord Byron

... hard, yea hapless, is that wretches chance, Luckless his lot and caytiffe like acourste, At whose proceedings fortune ever frowns. My self I mean, most subject unto thrall, For I, the more I seek to shun the worst, The more by proof I find myself accurst: Ere whiles assaulted with an ugly bear, Fair Amadine in company all alone, Forthwith by flight I thought to save my self, Leaving my Amadine unto her shifts: For death it was for to resist the bear, And death no less of Amadine's harms to hear. ...
— 2. Mucedorus • William Shakespeare [Apocrypha]

... blazoned in story The name of our Victor may be, Accurst is the march of that glory Which treads o'er ...
— The Complete Poems of Sir Thomas Moore • Thomas Moore et al

... Our daughters and our sisters and our wives Sore weeping as they weep who curse the day, To live, remote from help, dishonoured lives, Soothing their drunken masters with a song, Or dancing in their golden tinkling gyves: Accurst if they remember through the long Estrangement of their exile, twice accursed If they forget and join the accursed throng. 60 How doth my heart that is so wrung not burst When I remember that my way was plain, And that God's candle lit me at the first, Whilst now I grope in darkness, grope ...
— Goblin Market, The Prince's Progress, and Other Poems • Christina Rossetti

... frost-spangled air the warm, crimson waves of his hate. I only could peer and shudder and fear—'twas ever so ghastly and still; But I knew over there in his lonely despair he was plotting me terrible ill. I knew that he nursed a malice accurst, like the blast of a winnowing flame; I pleaded aloud for a shield, for a shroud—Oh, God! ...
— Ballads of a Cheechako • Robert W. Service

... screams; He falls beneath that bolt that on them gleams, And she is gone within the awful gloom. Hark! hear those screams! "Accurst! Accurst thy doom!" And lo! he springs upon his feet in pain, And cries: "Thy curses, fiend! I hurl again!" And now a blinding flash disparts the black And heavy air, a moment light doth break; And see! the King leans fainting 'gainst the mast, With glaring eyeballs, ...
— Babylonian and Assyrian Literature • Anonymous

... die accurst, Their glory bury'd with their dust, I, to my God, my heavenly King, Immortal ...
— The Psalms of David - Imitated in the Language of The New Testament - And Applied to The Christian State and Worship • Isaac Watts

... 'so deep accurst, That runn'st from pole to pole To seek a draught to slake thy thirst— Go, seek it ...
— Poetical Works of Matthew Arnold • Matthew Arnold



Words linked to "Accurst" :   maledict, curst, cursed



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