Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




A   Listen
preposition
A  prep.  Of. (Obs.) "The name of John a Gaunt." "What time a day is it?" "It's six a clock."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"A" Quotes from Famous Books



... House shall have a President and a Vice-President who shall be elected from among ...
— The Fight For The Republic In China • B.L. Putnam Weale

... weep and groan like a human being in pain and distress, in order to excite the sympathy of man, and thus allure him into ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Volume 19. Issue 539 - 24 Mar 1832 • Various

... freak is this?" quoth Stuyvesant grim. Quoth Herman, "'Twas a charger brave— Like my first bride in eye and limb— A wedding-gift; indulge the whim! And from his back to plunge, I crave, A bridegroom, in ...
— Tales of the Chesapeake • George Alfred Townsend

... (The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection) From the New York Packet. Friday, ...
— The Federalist Papers

... care, my lord; have a care! Restrain yourself, sit down if you don't want me to wring your neck ...
— In Search of El Dorado • Harry Collingwood

... opinion do make some trouble between my wife and me. But these are but foolish troubles and so not to be set to heart, yet it do disturb me mightily these things. To my office, and there all the morning. At noon being invited, I to the Sun behind the 'Change, to dinner to my Lord Belasses, where a great deal of discourse with him, and some good, among others at table he told us a very handsome passage of the King's sending him his message about holding out the town of Newarke, of which he was then governor for the King. ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... minutes. Then the anger faded from his face, and his expression grew very grave. He loved Giovanni exceedingly, and he loved Corona for his sake more than for her own, though he admired her and delighted in her conversation. It was certain that if there were a quarrel between husband and wife, and if Giovanni had the smallest show of right on his side, the old man's ...
— Sant' Ilario • F. Marion Crawford

... is of writing words to suit existing music, has its advantages. In some cases, as will be seen in the notes to the hymns, the musician, out of despair or even contempt for the doggrel offered to him, has composed a fine tune quite independent of the words to which it was dedicated[22], and such tunes have been silent ever since they were composed: while even when a melody has been actually inspired by a particular hymn, the attention of the composer to the first stanza has ...
— A Practical Discourse on Some Principles of Hymn-Singing • Robert Bridges

... be a doubt of it," said Captain Cannonby, alluding to the death. "I saw him die; I ...
— Verner's Pride • Mrs. Henry Wood

... can also shorten arms, but it takes both hands to do that, and in the meantime the whole body is exposed; while the Arab shortens his spear with the right-hand alone, and the left arm, with a round shield of hippopotamus hide upon it, can be used to put aside the bayonet thrust. Unless wounded to death, they fight on when they have fallen, clutching at their enemies' legs, stabbing while they can hold ...
— For Fortune and Glory - A Story of the Soudan War • Lewis Hough

... 1861, and we are happy to add that Messrs. Lechartier and Bellamy, who at first had prudently drawn no theoretical conclusions from their work, now entirely agree with the theory we have advanced. [Footnote: Those gentlemen express themselves thus: "In a note presented to the Academy in November, 1872, we published certain experiments which showed that carbonic acid and alcohol may be produced in fruits kept in a closed vessel, out of contact with atmospheric oxygen, without our being able to discover ...
— The Harvard Classics Volume 38 - Scientific Papers (Physiology, Medicine, Surgery, Geology) • Various

... a missionary meeting at the church that evening. All the Christian Endeavorers had been urged to attend. Elizabeth gave this as an excuse; but the manager quickly swept that away, saying she could go to church any night, but she could not go to this particular play with ...
— The Girl from Montana • Grace Livingston Hill

... is destined, shall arrive, after many long and miserable years, when, aware of the beneficence of living for others and in the imagined prospect of leading, guiding, and guarding a free people upon a free land, Faust shall be willing to say to the moment: "Stay, thou art so fair"; and Mephistopheles shall harshly cry out: "The clock stands still"; and the graybeard shall sink in the dust; and the holy angels shall ...
— Shadows of the Stage • William Winter

... given to our increasing population rights and privileges which we could not give—which as an old country we probably can never give. That self-asserting, obtrusive independence which so often wounds us is, if viewed aright, but an outward sign of those good things which a new country has produced for its people. Men and women do not beg in the States; they do not offend you with tattered rags; they do not complain to heaven of starvation; they do not crouch to the ground for half-pence. ...
— Volume 2 • Anthony Trollope

... of the population of New France were descended from settlers sent out within a short time after the first occupation of the country, and who were not selected for any peculiar qualifications. They were not led to emigrate from the spirit of adventure, disappointed ambition, ...
— The Conquest of Canada (Vol. 1 of 2) • George Warburton

... singular idea that his wife had vanished from home. Could this vanishing be one of the effects of traumatic neurasthenia? He hurried about and searched all the rooms again, looking with absurd carefulness, as if his wife were an insignificant object that might have dropped unperceived under a chair or ...
— Mr. Prohack • E. Arnold Bennett

... capital, is not open to foreign trade. In fact, it has no trade of any sort, and derives its whole importance from being the seat of government. But TIENTSIN (750,000), the port of Peking, and an important "treaty port," has a large trade, both foreign and local. Tientsin and Peking are connected by rail, and since the Russian government has obtained the right of connecting Peking with the Trans-Siberian Railway, it is more than likely that in time Tientsin will become a terminus of that railway. Of "treaty ports" ...
— Up To Date Business - Home Study Circle Library Series (Volume II.) • Various

... draught! [Much hurry, zeal, and confusion among courtiers. This kerchief closer round my throat! [They tie a kerchief round his throat. Was I in voice to-day? The prize is won, But I would be my own competitor And my own rival. Was I then ...
— Nero • Stephen Phillips

... insisting upon a LARGER FREEDOM, not in the way of demanding one thing or another, but in the way of realizing in your deeper self the ...
— Mastery of Self • Frank Channing Haddock

... Hinchingbrooke, who went thither without my knowledge, and I believe only to save his being taxed by the Poll Bill. I did give him no very good countenance nor welcome, but took occasion to go forth and walked (he with me) to St. Dunstan's, and thence I to Sir W. Coventry's, where a good while with him, and I think he pretty kind, but that the nature of our present condition affords not matter for either of us to be pleased with any thing. We discoursed of Carcasse, whose Lord, ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... nothing, but you tell me everything!" said Bouchard's hawk eyes. He was old-fashioned; he looked his part, which was one of the many points of difference between him and Lanstron as a chief of intelligence. ...
— The Last Shot • Frederick Palmer

... four miles off, begging that he and Mrs. Fairchild would come over, if it was convenient, to see her the next day to settle some business of consequence. This old lady's name was Mrs. Goodriche, and she lived in a very neat little house just under a hill, with Sukey her maid. It was the very house in which Mrs. Howard lived about fifty years ago, as we shall hear ...
— The Fairchild Family • Mary Martha Sherwood

... and Edward decided to fill it. He bought a shining new pail, screwed three hooks on the edge from which he hung three clean shimmering glasses, and one Saturday afternoon when a car stopped the boy leaped on, tactfully asked the conductor if he did not want a drink, and then proceeded to sell his water, cooled with ice, at a cent ...
— The Americanization of Edward Bok - The Autobiography of a Dutch Boy Fifty Years After • Edward William Bok (1863-1930)

... yourself five years older, and making a fortune rapidly by your art, in love with some girl whom you hope to make your wife. I ask you whether you would like to see her laughing and chatting en bonne camarade with a lot of wild young students. Still less, if you can imagine such a thing, joining heart and soul in the fun ...
— A Girl of the Commune • George Alfred Henty

... over, the Seniors were graciously pleased to adopt Gipsy's idea, and began to draw up a programme for the cafe chantant. Their struggle of the past had taught them a lesson in fair play, and they therefore proposed to admit a certain number of Juniors as performers, instead of, as formerly, keeping the whole ...
— The Leader of the Lower School - A Tale of School Life • Angela Brazil

... inferences about the kind of Christians these Brazilians make. If you had seen them face to face, you would have been, as I was, impressed with their appearance. They were the best-looking people I saw. Their countenances were clearer and there was a hopeful, resourceful look upon them that was not noticeable upon the non-believers. Sin and fear always break the spirit of men, and though there may be a brave look assumed, yet there always hangs a cloud over the countenance of the sin-stained ...
— Brazilian Sketches • T. B. Ray

... above you, by the high east window growing, Underneath them, slumber sweetly, lapt in silence deep, serene; Save, when pealing in the distance, organ notes towards you flowing Echo—with a pause between! ...
— Poems by Jean Ingelow, In Two Volumes, Volume II. • Jean Ingelow

... passed, when he told me that Melbourne was now become seriously alarmed, so much so that he had written to John Russell, 'he could neither eat, nor drink, nor sleep,' so great was his disturbance. Lord John was also extremely alarmed, and both he and Melbourne had been considerably moved by a letter the former had received from the Duke of Bedford, enclosing one from Lord Spencer, in which he entered into the whole Eastern Question; and said that it was his earnest desire to give his support to the Government in all their measures, ...
— The Greville Memoirs (Second Part) - A Journal of the Reign of Queen Victoria from 1837 to 1852 - (Volume 1 of 3) • Charles C. F. Greville

... celebrated work; and it may safely be affirmed that a more complete failure to overcome a great and admitted difficulty—a more unsatisfactory solution of an important question—is not to be found in the whole history of ...
— The Fallen Star; and, A Dissertation on the Origin of Evil • E. L. Bulwer; and, Lord Brougham

... me sick, I tell you.... And now a lot of dum fools are goin' to give 'em the right to ...
— Galusha the Magnificent • Joseph C. Lincoln

... A few days before the battle of Borodino, Nicholas received the necessary money and warrants, and having sent some hussars on in advance, he set out with ...
— War and Peace • Leo Tolstoy

... green with a large yellow diamond in the center bearing a blue celestial globe with 27 white five-pointed stars (one for each state and the Federal District) arranged in the same pattern as the night sky over Brazil; the globe has ...
— The 2003 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... was a holiday turned to such good account before,' a gray-haired dramatic critic was saying to her, a man with whose keen, good-natured face London had been familiar for the last twenty years. 'What magic has touched ...
— Miss Bretherton • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... is a barbarous and inhuman system of protecting the German advance. When the Belgian soldiers fired on the enemy they killed their own people. Again and again innocent civilians of both sexes were sacrificed to protect the invading army ...
— Kings, Queens And Pawns - An American Woman at the Front • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... at once, "I don't like my shoes. They have been brother Karl's. When I asked father this morning to give me some new ones, he said this was a fine strong pair and did not let in water, and he could not think of letting them go to waste. Then he looked sorrowful, and I heard him say to mother, 'The poor children will have to earn all they have soon.' I made up my mind to begin at once, and earn ...
— Little Tora, The Swedish Schoolmistress and Other Stories • Mrs. Woods Baker

... sat a gigantic young man of a slightly threadbare appearance, who was copying some screed out of a bulky tome before him. I regarded him in a reminiscent sort of way for a few minutes, and presently found that my scrutiny was being returned fourfold. Next came an ...
— The Right Stuff - Some Episodes in the Career of a North Briton • Ian Hay

... house together they returned. 430 —Hushed was that House in peace, or seeming peace, [45] Ere the night fell:—with morrow's dawn the Boy [46] Began his journey, and when he had reached The public way, he put on a bold face; And all the neighbours, as he passed their doors, 435 Came forth with wishes and with farewell prayers, That followed him till he was out ...
— The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth, Vol. II. • William Wordsworth

... E. Woodworth is a name that in most published accounts figures conspicuously among the relief parties organized to rescue the Donner Party. At the time Reed and his companions were suffering untold horrors on the mountains, and those left at Starved Camp were ...
— History of the Donner Party • C.F. McGlashan

... Exertion. — N. exertion, effort, strain, tug, pull, stress, throw, stretch, struggle, spell, spurt, spirt[obs3]; stroke of work, stitch of work. "a strong pull a long pull and a pull all together"; dead lift; heft; gymnastics; exercise, exercitation[obs3]; wear and tear; ado; toil and trouble; uphill work, hard work, warm work; harvest time. ...
— Roget's Thesaurus

... the Chances of Peace will be a reckoning of forces which may be counted on to keep a patriotic nation in an unstable equilibrium of ...
— An Inquiry Into The Nature Of Peace And The Terms Of Its Perpetuation • Thorstein Veblen

... substance, upon which the Right Whale largely feeds. For leagues and leagues it undulated round us, so that we seemed to be sailing through boundless fields of ripe and golden wheat. On the second day, numbers of Right Whales were seen, who, secure from the attack of a Sperm Whaler like the Pequod, with open jaws sluggishly swam through the brit, which, adhering to the fringing fibres of that wondrous Venetian blind in their mouths, was in that manner separated from the water that escaped at the lip. As morning mowers, ...
— Moby-Dick • Melville

... call themselves Attilans, claim descent from a portion of that vast invading horde of Attila the Hun, which fell back in defeat from the battle of Chalons, in the year 451, and has occupied the eastern portion of Transylvania ever since. The Magyars are of the same or a nearly kindred race, and speak the same language; but their ancestry is ...
— Manasseh - A Romance of Transylvania • Maurus Jokai

... by d'Arthez without Lucien's knowledge, the newcomer was at length judged worthy to make one of the cenacle of lofty thinkers. Henceforward he was to be one of a little group of young men who met almost every evening in d'Arthez's room, united by the keenest sympathies and by the earnestness of their intellectual life. They all foresaw a great writer in d'Arthez; they looked upon him as their chief since the loss of one of their number, a mystical ...
— Lost Illusions • Honore De Balzac

... went away from home to a city which is, without doubt, a very beautiful city, and joined the ranks of students in a medical school which for size and thorough work is not to be despised. He was not slow to drink in the new ideas which a first introduction ...
— The Mermaid - A Love Tale • Lily Dougall

... But I winced a little, privately, in the very bottom of my heart, that I had let Thorold have so much liberty; that I had let him know so easily what he was to me. I seemed unlike the Daisy Randolph of my former acquaintance. She was never so free. But it was done; and I had ...
— Daisy in the Field • Elizabeth Wetherell

... for yourselves; and I am going back to tell that in the East of the World," he said. Finn heard him saying that, and he lying on the ground in his blood, and the best men of the sons of Baiscne about him, and he said: "It is a pity I not to have found death before I heard the foreigner saying those words. And nothing I myself have done, or the Fianna of Ireland, is worth anything since there is left a man of the foreigners alive to go back into the great world again to tell that story. And is there any one ...
— Gods and Fighting Men • Lady I. A. Gregory

... had been to Durazzo to confer with the Italians; he had refused to accept an Italian protectorate in Albania, and on his return he was killed in his carriage before he could reach Scutari. The chief assailant was a Catholic of Klementi, believed to be an adherent of Essad Pasha and also an Italian "agent d'occasion." Yet as several Italian soldiers who accompanied Bib Doda were wounded it would seem that those, myself included, who believed that this affair had been arranged ...
— The Birth of Yugoslavia, Volume 2 • Henry Baerlein

... which verily seems better fitted to receive phantoms than real living guests, would not permit me to offer you more comfortable accommodations. If I had been able to follow my inclinations, I should have lodged you in a luxurious chamber, where you could have reposed between fine linen sheets, under silken curtains, instead of resting uneasily ...
— Captain Fracasse • Theophile Gautier

... of an honest republican. She shall return.' I soon found myself in my brother's room, whom I embraced tenderly; but we were torn asunder, and I was obliged to go into another room.—[This was the last time the brother and sister met] . . . Chaumette then questioned me about a thousand shocking things of which they accused my mother and aunt; I was so indignant at hearing such horrors that, terrified as I was, I could not help exclaiming that they ...
— Marguerite de Navarre - Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois Queen of Navarre • Marguerite de Navarre

... alone, the old usurer observed to his partner—"I am lost in astonishment at what you are about to do, Sir Giles. That I should make a sacrifice for a dainty damsel, whose charms are doubled because she should belong to an enemy, is not surprising; but that you should give up so easily a property you have so long coveted—I confess I cannot ...
— The Star-Chamber, Volume 2 - An Historical Romance • W. Harrison Ainsworth

... confessed the mysteries of life. Having planted his corn, he made his pregnant squaw walk round the seed-bed in hope of receiving from the Source of life increased blessing and sustenance for body and mind. Between such a truly religious act of the savage, and that of the Christian sage, Joseph Henry, who uncovered his head while investigating electro-magnetism to "ask God a question," or that of Samuel F.B. Morse, who sent ...
— The Religions of Japan - From the Dawn of History to the Era of Meiji • William Elliot Griffis

... no doubt. (Thoughtfully) It is a great responsibility, this that they have put ...
— The Atlantic Book of Modern Plays • Various

... the panorama, she did not see Westerling, who had stopped only a few feet distant with his aide and his valet, nor did he notice her as the tumult glazed his eyes. He was as an artist who looks on the ribbons of the canvas of his painting, or the sculptor on the fragments of his statue. ...
— The Last Shot • Frederick Palmer

... of man shall come in the glory of his Father, with his Angels, and then he shall reward every man according to his works." The same we may read, Marke 13..26. and 14.26. and more expressely for the time, Luke 22.29, 30. "I appoint unto you a Kingdome, as my Father hath appointed to mee, that you may eat and drink at my table in my Kingdome, and sit on thrones judging the twelve tribes of Israel." By which it is manifest that the Kingdome of Christ appointed to him by his Father, is not to ...
— Leviathan • Thomas Hobbes

... ably directed by Cyrus Harding, was a complete success. The wool, previously impregnated with a solution of soap, intended on the one hand to facilitate the interlacing, the compression, and the softening of the wool, and on the other to prevent its diminution by the beating, issued from the ...
— The Mysterious Island • Jules Verne

... of caution, and we forbore building a fire. Our horses, which we had picketed in the open overnight, we saddled and tied out of sight in the brush. Then we ate a cold breakfast and betook ourselves to the nearest hill-top, where, screened by a huddle of rocks, we could ...
— Raw Gold - A Novel • Bertrand W. Sinclair

... measures here recommended, would have a sensible effect in diminishing the expenditure of this colony; and would amply compensate for any loss which the government might sustain by affording settlers a passage thither, free of expence, in the transports. I ...
— Statistical, Historical and Political Description of the Colony of New South Wales and its Dependent Settlements in Van Diemen's Land • William Charles Wentworth

... of responsibility for the war than they gave utterance to their opinions; journals avowed themselves pro-Ally, large subscriptions were raised in many sections for the relief of the European sufferers, particularly Belgium, and a number of young men joined the Entente armies. In Brazil, which was always supposed to have a German bias on account of her large German colonies, some of the foremost publicists and writers voluntarily formed the "Liga ...
— Defenders of Democracy • The Militia of Mercy

... imposing buildings in Boston twenty years ago was a granite hotel, whose western windows looked upon a graveyard. Passing up a flight of steps, and beneath a portico of dignified granite columns, and so through an embarrassing pair of swinging-doors to the roomy vestibule,—you would there pause a moment to spit upon ...
— Idolatry - A Romance • Julian Hawthorne

... rose with the emergence, and met the crisis with a degree of energy and magnanimity which elicited, in those barbarous times, the admiration even of his enemies. The Protestants heroically grasped their arms and rallied together for mutual protection. War, with all its ...
— Henry IV, Makers of History • John S. C. Abbott

... commitments of the Order in Tripoli proved a constant drain on its resources. Time after time Charles V. was appealed to for help in holding Tripoli, which was very difficult to fortify because of the sandy nature of the soil, and difficult to succour because of its ...
— Knights of Malta, 1523-1798 • R. Cohen

... named Thomas asked—an' he was a very doubting follower of Jesus, like too many of us. The Master said to him what He says to you and me, 'I am the way and the truth and the life; no one cometh unto the Father ...
— The Battery and the Boiler - Adventures in Laying of Submarine Electric Cables • R.M. Ballantyne

... question was, as to who of my brother members would consent to walk with me? The answer was not long in coming. There was one man present who was broad enough to take in the whole situation, and brave enough to meet the duty of the hour; one who was neither afraid nor ashamed to own me as a man and a brother; one man of the purest Caucasian type, a poet and a scholar, brilliant as a writer, eloquent as a speaker, and holding a high and influential position—the editor of a weekly journal having the largest circulation of any ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume II • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... to find, that the tide did not at present rise sufficient to admit the large boats into the fresh water, so that getting a load would have been a very long operation, had it not been for a tremendous fall of rain that followed a thunderstorm, deluging every pool, and at once affording the means of filling the casks. This storm began at South-East and drew round by ...
— Discoveries in Australia, Volume 2 • John Lort Stokes

... the kindliest feeling toward every section of our common country, for each and all contributed to her past glory and present greatness. Among those who cast their lot in Texas when every step was a challenge to destiny and every hour was darkened by a danger; who faced unflinchingly the trials of frontier life and carved out an independent republic with the sword, were men from every State of the American union. One instance will suffice (though scores might be cited) to ...
— Volume 12 of Brann The Iconoclast • William Cowper Brann

... a gang? Their number would have inspired them with confidence; if, indeed confidence is ever wanting in the breast of the arrant blackguard; and of arrant blackguards alone are the supposed gangs ever constituted. Their number, I say, ...
— The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 1 (of 5) of the Raven Edition • Edgar Allan Poe

... the better. Your bank-notes will meet with a better reception elsewhere," said Arabella, hurriedly. "But come, let us go to work. Burn all indiscreet papers, and take every thing that you can secrete. And now away with you! I must be alone, for I have enough to do to keep me up this ...
— Joseph II. and His Court • L. Muhlbach

... Syme, "I can understand your putting on his dirty old beard for a night's practical joke, but I don't understand your never ...
— The Man Who Was Thursday - A Nightmare • G. K. Chesterton

... number of years of freedom, and further declares (Judges ii:18) that the Hebrew state was prosperous during the whole time of the judges. (5) Therefore it is evident that Levi Ben Gerson (certainly a very learned man), and those who follow him, correct rather ...
— A Theologico-Political Treatise [Part II] • Benedict de Spinoza

... afraid Bantling was ashamed of me," Lord Warburton laughed again. Isabel took pleasure in that note; she gave a small sigh of relief as they ...
— The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1 (of 2) • Henry James

... Parthenissa for her Comfort, That the Beauties, generally speaking, are the most impertinent and disagreeable of Women. An apparent Desire of Admiration, a Reflection upon their own Merit, and a precious Behaviour in their general Conduct, are almost inseparable Accidents in Beauties. All you obtain of them is granted to Importunity and Sollicitation for what did not deserve so much of your Time, and you recover from the Possession ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... forces upon the hill, that place lost its worship and esteem; for the soldiers turned it all upside down, and dug it up in the hope of finding some treasure, and found no trace of a human body. The Indians were terrified at their boldness, and asked whether those who dared to do so much would not die. Thereupon, those people were left with only the staff [of that teacher], which the Kasis [caciques] keep; for that is the staff of all virtues, and in going out ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 - Volume 40 of 55 • Francisco Colin

... begged him to be so kind as to step closer, and asked him if it were not a beautiful texture and lovely colours. They pointed to the empty loom, and the poor old minister went forward rubbing his eyes; but he could see nothing, ...
— The Yellow Fairy Book • Various

... about one and a half hours when the anchor was let go with the usual rattle, and we heard some one from another boat shouting that the troops were to remain on board till morning. No one took the trouble to look out to see where we were, such a thing seemed to ...
— The Incomparable 29th and the "River Clyde" • George Davidson

... Ath. III. 805-806. In Davenant's works (pp. 341-359 of folio edition of 1673) will be found, by those who are curious, a copy of "The First Day's Entertainment at Rutland House by Declamations and Musick: after the manner of the Ancients." It strikes one as very proper and very heavy, but it may have been a godsend to the Londoners after their long deprivation ...
— The Life of John Milton, Volume 5 (of 7), 1654-1660 • David Masson

... into your thick head," burst out the pilot, "that I'm not here to start a colony! We can take off from this blasted planet whenever we want to. We didn't come ...
— Star Born • Andre Norton

... about what she should pack into her little bundle. She would make it very small, for the fewer things she took with her the more she would buy at Spanish Town. But the contents of her package did not require much thought, and she soon became a little tired staying there by herself, and therefore she was glad to see young Dickory, with ...
— Kate Bonnet - The Romance of a Pirate's Daughter • Frank R. Stockton

... any questions you wish to put to me. It is the least I can do after having made such a fool of myself. It was the shock of seeing Peggy in the room that robbed me of my judgment. I should have known her better, but you must remember that I had no idea she was in the house until I looked through the door in the wall which ...
— The Shrieking Pit • Arthur J. Rees

... are long enough to enable him to stand some distance from the gun. And, if he likes, he can crouch behind that concrete wall of the next barbette. Still, there is some chance of an accident, for, no matter how carefully you calculate the strain of a bursting charge of powder, and how strongly you construct the breech-block to stand the strain, there is always the possibility of a flaw in the metal. So, Ned, I think we'll just go to the bomb-proof ourselves, ...
— Tom Swift and his Giant Cannon - or, The Longest Shots on Record • Victor Appleton

... play cribbage while I was in that camp. I was pitted, by common consent, against an expert, a man who had been wounded at Le Cateau and had his teeth knocked out as he lay on the ground by a passing German, who used the butt of his rifle. Round me were a dozen men, who gave me advice and explained in whispers the finesse of the game. It was hot work, ...
— A Padre in France • George A. Birmingham

... a loose eyelash on the back of your hand. It signifies a letter. Wish from whom the letter may come, carry it three times around your head, then throw it over your shoulder, and you will ...
— Current Superstitions - Collected from the Oral Tradition of English Speaking Folk • Various

... resided on Euclid avenue over thirty years, having built the residence now owned by General Oviatt, adjoining the present residence of Mr. D. P. Eells, in 1838, the site at that time being outside the city limits. After a few years he sold this to Thomas Bolton, and in 1840, built a brick cottage opposite Brownell street, which he occupied about fifteen years, when it gave place to the present edifice, the land having been in the family ...
— Cleveland Past and Present - Its Representative Men, etc. • Maurice Joblin

... be a sort of fatality in my mind leading me to put at first my statement or proposition in a wrong or awkward form. Formerly I used to think about my sentences before writing them down; but for several years ...
— The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Volume I • Francis Darwin

... came in that night I saw that the poor fellow was terribly downcast. 'The Mary Ann's days are numbered, sir; she'll never be able to rough it again,' he said. 'She's been a good old boat to me and my father before me, and it will be like parting from an old friend to give her up. Yon man, he says she might be cobbled together a bit; but you would never make a good job of her; she'd do maybe ...
— Christie, the King's Servant • Mrs. O. F. Walton

... impressed on the shale which contains them, that not only are the veins and nerves distinctly visible, but even the fructification still remains in the shape of the marks left by the so-called seeds on the backs of the leaves. Something more than a passing look at the coal specimens in a good museum will well repay the ...
— The Story of a Piece of Coal - What It Is, Whence It Comes, and Whither It Goes • Edward A. Martin

... the only thing that I asked you not to mention was that I had any light of revelation on a point on which most of our minds is ...
— The Mormon Prophet • Lily Dougall

... are at the very beginning of annalistic writing is clear, even from the fragmentary remains. The work is in annals form, in so far as the events of the various years are separated by lines, but it is hardly more than a list of places captured and of booty taken, strung together by a few formulae. [Footnote: Scheil, OLZ. VII. 216. Now in the Morgan ...
— Assyrian Historiography • Albert Ten Eyck Olmstead

... make knowne It is no vicious blot, murther, or foulenesse, No vnchaste action or dishonoured step That hath depriu'd me of your Grace and fauour, But euen for want of that, for which I am richer, A still soliciting eye, and such a tongue, That I am glad I haue not, though not to haue it, Hath lost ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... Mrs. Shamela, or Pamela, which I have taken Pains to transcribe from the Originals, sent down by her Mother in a Rage, at the Proposal in her last Letter. The Originals themselves are in my hands, and shall be communicated to you, if you think proper to make them publick; and certainly they will have their Use. The Character of Shamela, will make young Gentlemen wary how they take the ...
— An Apology for the Life of Mrs. Shamela Andrews • Conny Keyber

... the storm increased, and the sea, which I had never been upon before, went very high, though nothing like what I have seen many times since; no, nor like what I saw a few days after: but it was enough to affect me then, who was but a young sailor, and had never known any thing of the matter. I expected every wave would have swallowed us up, and that every time the ship fell down, ...
— The Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (1808) • Daniel Defoe

... morning he joined the family in the breakfast parlor, where he was received with much kindness and attention. The stranger was a young man, probably about twenty-seven, well made, and with features that must be pronounced good; but, from whatever cause it proceeded, they were felt to be by no means agreeable. It was impossible to quarrel with, or find fault with them; their ...
— The Evil Eye; Or, The Black Spector - The Works of William Carleton, Volume One • William Carleton

... as quickly. "I wouldn't have you say that, sir. I don't think it any part of my duty to be fond of my lady. I have served her faithfully this many a year; but if she were to die to-morrow, I believe, before Heaven I shouldn't shed a tear for her." Then, after a pause, "I have no reason to love her!" Mrs. Bread added. "The most she has done for me has been not to turn me out of the house." Newman felt that decidedly his companion was more ...
— The American • Henry James

... old writers were parted with, and a great many fresh contributors were found. While special departments, such as science, art, music and the drama, were of necessity entrusted to regular hands, indeed, the reviewing of books, now more than ever the principal business of 'The Athenaeum,' was ...
— Early Reviews of English Poets • John Louis Haney

... Hence, Thirdly,—and as a result of the various features in the Gladstonian Constitution which have been already noted, there exist under it three bodies with different functions which, by whatever name they may be each called, ought to be carefully ...
— England's Case Against Home Rule • Albert Venn Dicey

... be added the aspirate {h} and the affricatae (i.e. an explosive a homorganic spirant) {z} ...
— A Middle High German Primer - Third Edition • Joseph Wright

... the following day the advance was continued by the 137th and 139th Brigades who passed through us, but, as the 32nd Division had still no definite information, we maintained our defensive flank position—a ludicrous performance in view of the streams of unmolested traffic which passed along the road in front of us. Later in the morning, however, "B" and "C" Companies were sent forward to occupy the line that the Lincolnshires had held during the night, where they found no cover except one large ...
— The Fifth Leicestershire - A Record Of The 1/5th Battalion The Leicestershire Regiment, - T.F., During The War, 1914-1919. • J.D. Hills

... stinging of my eyes, I pulled up at last, turned right-about face, leant back against the blast with a hand on my hat, and surveyed the blackness I had traversed. It was at this instant that, far away to the left, a point of light caught my notice, faint but steady; and at once I felt sure it burnt in the window of a house. "The house," thought ...
— McClure's Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 5, April, 1896 • Various

... and then twelve, and yet no sign of David or Anna, the Squire had reached for his fur cap and announced his intention of "going to look for 'em." But like the proverbial worm, the wife of his bosom had turned, and with all the determination of a white ...
— 'Way Down East - A Romance of New England Life • Joseph R. Grismer

... a day, mother, and live upon pork and beans, as well as the next man." He stood to his full height, displaying to the pale woman the outlines of massive muscular development. His hands were huge and callous, their grip the terror ...
— McClure's Magazine, January, 1896, Vol. VI. No. 2 • Various

... inquired for John Swinton's cottage told him that it was the last on the left. Although he told himself that he had nothing to be afraid of, it needed all Ned's determination to nerve himself to tap at the door of the low thatched cottage. A ...
— Through the Fray - A Tale of the Luddite Riots • G. A. Henty

... roads from Liverpool and from Manchester to the north became confluent. Within these first three stages lay the foundation, the progress, and termination of our night's adventure. During the first stage, I found out that Cyclops was mortal: he was liable to the shocking affection of sleep—a thing which I had never previously suspected. If a man is addicted to the vicious habit of sleeping, all the skill in aurigation of Apollo himself, with the horses of Aurora to execute the motions of his will, avail him nothing. "Oh, Cyclops!" I exclaimed more than once, "Cyclops, my friend; ...
— Miscellaneous Essays • Thomas de Quincey

... a man in his right mind try to conceive of Darwin feeling flattered by the notice of a princess. It's so grotesque that it—well, it paralyzes the imagination. Yet that Memnon was flattered by the notice of that statuette; he ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... hair in shape, she took up the hat. This part of her apparel, which had been stepped on without detriment but needed brushing, might be described as a man's hat in the sense that its maker had not intended it for a young lady. It was a black hat, of soft felt, with a wide flat rim which had been turned up in front and fastened with a breastpin, a measure which ...
— The Wrong Woman • Charles D. Stewart

... living he will be of interest to all about him. Men with humble abilities, if full of this Spiritual Life, will be a charm and a blessing wherever they go. Look at the lives and writings of such humble men as Billy Bray, Carvosso, and Hodgson Casson. Their memory is an ointment poured forth to-day after ...
— The Authoritative Life of General William Booth • George Scott Railton

... since learnt, told his Lordship, that he fancied I had some Glimmerings of Reason, notwithstanding the hideous Make of my Person, and gave for an Instance, my getting into my Bed as decently as a Cacklogallinian; and that of my Species certainly had a Language among 'em, for he had heard me very distinctly utter some unintelligible Words, and even ...
— A Voyage to Cacklogallinia - With a Description of the Religion, Policy, Customs and Manners of That Country • Captain Samuel Brunt

... cliffs together, and for the greater part of the way in silence; at last the curate spoke. He told the Jew quite truly that he believed the vicar's wife had his jewel, and that he supposed she must have come by it according to his worst suspicions. 'But,' he added, 'I believe she is a good woman.' ...
— A Dozen Ways Of Love • Lily Dougall

... the General's use of the words "battles" and "the enemy," and his statement that he would himself be "in the firing line" at the first "battle." He said that, when some casualties had been suffered by the troops, he intended to approach "the enemy" with a flag of truce and demand their surrender, and if this should be refused he would order an assault on their position. The cavalry, whose pro-Ulster sentiments must have been well known to the Commander-in-Chief, were told that they ...
— Ulster's Stand For Union • Ronald McNeill

... "I think it would be a good plan for those of us who have rifles to be on the lookout and pick off any of the redskins who show themselves. Even if we don't get any, it will prevent ...
— Bert Wilson in the Rockies • J. W. Duffield

... it a great comfort for us to be as we are now, and to know that my father can never ...
— Phelim O'toole's Courtship and Other Stories • William Carleton

... went to see a friend's house. It is interesting and I should like to live in one like it. There is no water except what the water man brings every day. This little house has eighteen rooms around a court. It means ...
— Letters from China and Japan • John Dewey

... well in to the base of the mountain all traces of the exodus was lost, though bush instinct, supplemented by the actions of the dogs, gave sense of its direction. Blundering down into a ravine where blanched vegetation betokened complete seclusion from the sun, we clambered up the opposing steep emerging from an entanglement of jungle on a high and open ridge which commanded an unimpeded view to the west—a scene of theatrical ...
— Tropic Days • E. J. Banfield

... to turn a little testy as the constable finished. He seemed a magistrate who liked to be paternal, and he appeared to grow impatient under the extraordinarily correct language ...
— None Other Gods • Robert Hugh Benson

... old beliefs sits very lightly on all the emigrant children of Japhet. Yet many historical events are clearly buried in the myths before the Pandavas. Wilson's statement (Lassen, i. 479 n.) of the contents of a Purana, shows still a consciousness of those epochs. There must be (1) a dwelling in the primitive country (bordering on the ideal), quite obscure, historically; (2) expulsion, through a change of climate; (3) life in the land of the Aryans (Iran.); (4) migration to and ...
— Chips From A German Workshop. Vol. III. • F. Max Mueller

... "I come from a land in the sun-bright deep, Where golden gardens glow, Where the winds of the north, becalmed in sleep, Their ...
— TITLE • AUTHOR

... understood or even discerned by the nations which they more particularly concerned. The British sea-power, notwithstanding the first year of the war of 1812, had come out of the great European conflict unshaken and indeed more preeminent than ever. The words used, half a century before by a writer in the great French 'Encyclopedie,' seemed more exact than when first written. 'L'empiredesmers,' he says, is, 'le plus avantageux de tous les empires; les Phoeniciens le possedoient autre fois et c'est aux Anglois que cette gloire appartient ...
— Sea-Power and Other Studies • Admiral Sir Cyprian Bridge

... this moment there is open beside me as I write, a page of Persian manuscript, wrought with wreathed azure and gold, and soft green, and violet, and ruby and scarlet, into one field of pure resplendence. It is wrought to delight the eyes only; and does delight them; ...
— The Queen of the Air • John Ruskin

... Slope, I must ask you to let Mr Thorne sit here just for a moment or two. I am sure you will pardon me. We can take a liberty with you this week. Next week, you know, when you move into the dean's house, we shall all be afraid ...
— Barchester Towers • Anthony Trollope



Words linked to "A" :   feel like a million, A level, element of a cone, make a face, have a go at it, element of a cylinder, take a dare, deaf as a post, provitamin A, characteristic root of a square matrix, cock-a-hoop, turn a nice dime, of a sudden, get a noseful, take a hop, moment of a couple, throw a fit, shoot a line, a few, high-muck-a-muck, grind to a halt, a capella singing, micromillimetre, cap-a-pie, love-in-a-mist, Thomas a Becket, turn a blind eye, blow a fuse, strike a note, type A, amp, forever and a day, make a clean breast of, go a long way, get a whiff, pied-a-terre, nucleotide, at a time, beyond a doubt, to a great extent, hepatitis A, A-scan ultrasonography, take a crap, pit-a-pat, millimicron, a couple of, care a hang, moment of a magnet, in a low voice, for a bargain price, get a load, A battery, turn a nice dollar, picometer, eigenvalue of a matrix, in a bad way, a fortiori, play a trick on, a cappella, on a higher floor, broth of a boy, a hundred times, rub-a-dub, man-on-a-horse, to a higher place, to a greater extent, a posteriori, drop a line, since a long time ago, at a loss, have a ball, give a damn, call it a day, A-horizon, not by a long sight, not by a blame sight, a trifle, cock-a-doodle-doo, take a firm stand, micromicron, quite a little, beat a retreat, make a motion, turn a trick, chock-a-block, pig-a-back, broth of a man, angstrom, raise a stink, take a leak, angstrom unit, A-team, after a fashion, turn a nice penny, degree of a polynomial, domain of a function, spend a penny, get a line, bright as a new penny, rent-a-car, naked as a jaybird, a million times, have a bun in the oven, have a go, abatement of a nuisance, pull a fast one on, in a broad way, all of a sudden, take a breather, degree of a term, a great deal, in a nutshell, folie a deux, tete-a-tete, smart as a whip, group A, give a hang, A-line, immunoglobulin A, catch a glimpse, A-bomb, eigenvalue of a square matrix, rat-a-tat, page-at-a-time printer, without a stitch, take a breath, send a message, one at a time, at a low price, do a job on, like a shot, tete a tete, to a man, as a group, give it a try, retinol, in a similar way, make a stink, half a dozen, in a beastly manner, a la mode, take a bow, Linear A, for a while, turn a loss, a Kempis, turn a profit, rat-a-tat-tat, give a hoot, imaginary part of a complex number, ring-a-rosy, draw a blank, to a T, vis-a-vis, a bit, take a look, a la carte, blood group, draw a line, take a hit, bric-a-brac, a-ok, get a look, two-a-penny, paint a picture, line-at-a-time printer, jack-a-lantern, feel like a million dollars, current unit, son of a bitch, Al-Jama'a al-Islamiyyah al-Muqatilah bi-Libya, ampere, at a lower place, time and a half, rope-a-dope, A-one, purine, menage a trois, on a lower floor, as a matter of fact, give it a whirl, ring-around-a-rosy, a good deal, nm, to a lesser extent, terminus a quo, range of a function, as a formality, in a heartfelt way, Saint Thomas a Becket, even a little, blood type, strike a chord, a priori, draw a bead on, 5-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, play a joke on, in a way, make a point, have a fit, deoxyadenosine monophosphate, turn on a dime, take a chance, catch a wink, character-at-a-time printer, antiophthalmic factor, A-list



Copyright © 2018 Free-Translator.com