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English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




A   Listen
preposition
A  prep.  
1.
In; on; at; by. (Obs.) "A God's name." "Torn a pieces." "Stand a tiptoe." "A Sundays" "Wit that men have now a days." "Set them a work."
2.
In process of; in the act of; into; to; used with verbal substantives in -ing which begin with a consonant. This is a shortened form of the preposition an (which was used before the vowel sound); as in a hunting, a building, a begging. "Jacob, when he was a dying" "We'll a birding together." " It was a doing." "He burst out a laughing." Note: The hyphen may be used to connect a with the verbal substantive (as, a-hunting, a-building) or the words may be written separately. This form of expression is now for the most part obsolete, the a being omitted and the verbal substantive treated as a participle.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"A" Quotes from Famous Books



... abroad. War was no less costly for being ineffective, and it necessitated demands on the purses of Englishmen, to which they had long been unused. In the autumn of 1522 Wolsey was compelled to have recourse to a loan from both spiritualty and temporalty.[469] It seems to have met with a response which, compared with later receptions, (p. 165) may be described as almost cheerful. But the loan did not go far, and before another ...
— Henry VIII. • A. F. Pollard

... the collections of the Mysteries performed at Chester, Coventry, Woodkirk, and York have been preserved, without speaking of fragments of other series. Most of those texts belong to the fourteenth century, but have been retouched at a later date.[787] Old Mysteries did not escape the hand of the improvers, any more than old churches, where any one who pleased added paintings, porches, and tracery, according to the fashion ...
— A Literary History of the English People - From the Origins to the Renaissance • Jean Jules Jusserand

... when you have a great deal to say, and this must be proportioned to the facts and circumstances which you have to relate. In general, you must slightly run through little things, and dwell longer on great ones. When you treat your friends, ...
— Trips to the Moon • Lucian

... are as essential in ideation as in perception. The stability of an image, or internal sensation, thus depends on the activity of its motor accompaniments or conditions. And as the presence of an image to the exclusion of a rival, which but for the effect of these motor advantages would have as strong a claim as itself to the occupation of consciousness (cf. Series I., X.), may be treated as a case of inhibition, the greater the relative persistence of an image or idea the greater ...
— Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1 • Various

... discovered consulting our History—and more or less ashamed of ourselves, if we were publicly discovered devouring our Fiction. An architectural peculiarity in the original arrangement of the library favored the development of this common and curious form of human stupidity. While a row of luxurious arm-chairs, in the main thoroughfare of the room, invited the reader of solid literature to reveal himself in the act of cultivating a virtue, a row of snug little curtained recesses, opening at intervals out of one of the walls, enabled ...
— Man and Wife • Wilkie Collins

... Iowa was still disputed for by squatters and Indians. These latter, who exceeded the whites in number, belonged to a great tribe, both turbulent and warlike, the Saxes and the Foxes. They were at peace with the Government at the time I speak of, but a deputation of their chiefs, numbering thirty or forty, came on board our boat, on their way to Washington, where they desired to lay their grievances ...
— Memoirs • Prince De Joinville

... our country as you love it, Elias. I understand to some extent what you desire. I have heard with attention what you have said; yet, despite all of that, my friend, I believe we are looking upon it with a little prejudice. Here, less than in other things, I ...
— Friars and Filipinos - An Abridged Translation of Dr. Jose Rizal's Tagalog Novel, - 'Noli Me Tangere.' • Jose Rizal

... more at the time. But he was troubled; and when the barber came again, he began at once to ask about the woman who had been seen in the woods. The wicked man was delighted, and made up a long story. He said one of the waiting women had told him of what she had seen. The woman, he said, had followed the lady home one day, and that home was not far from the palace. She had seen her bending over a fire ...
— Hindu Tales from the Sanskrit • S. M. Mitra and Nancy Bell

... very beautiful day. In the morning a light fall of rain had passed across the town, and all the afternoon you could see signs, here and there upon the horizon, of other showers. The ground was dry again, while the breeze was cool and sweet, smelling of wet foliage and bringing sunshine ...
— Old Creole Days • George Washington Cable

... for the service she has rendered humanity, one which is distinctly woman's service, and she long ago came to realize that it was impossible to do this work as it should be done unless she and the women associated with her had the ballot." Miss Addams referred to a committee hearing once before when she was able to give but one precedent for the jurisdiction of Congress over the franchise—the 15th Amendment—but now, she said, she could give nine more. She cited the case of the Indians, the Confederate ...
— The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume V • Ida Husted Harper

... over, we wandered back into the drawing-room, and presently all left but Colonel Harvey. Clemens and the Colonel went up to the billiard-room and engaged in a game of cushion caroms, at twenty-five cents a game. I was umpire and stakeholder, and it was a most interesting occupation, for the series was close and a very cheerful one. It ended the day much to ...
— Mark Twain, A Biography, 1835-1910, Complete - The Personal And Literary Life Of Samuel Langhorne Clemens • Albert Bigelow Paine

... "More of a prized possession," offered Stover. "If you ain't got the loy'lty to stand by us, we got to make you! This diet is part of the programme. Now if you think beef is too hearty for this time of day, tear into ...
— Going Some • Rex Beach

... or Charleston, Mobile or New Orleans, the slaves were sold at wholesale, in the auction place. Later, the slave dealer drove them in gangs through the villages, where they were sold at retail. The cost of a slave varied with the price of cotton. Of the three million one hundred thousand slaves living in the South in 1850, one million eight hundred thousand were raising cotton. That was the great export, the basis of prosperity. So great was the demand in England for Southern cotton that ...
— The Battle of Principles - A Study of the Heroism and Eloquence of the Anti-Slavery Conflict • Newell Dwight Hillis

... to be afraid not, beautiful, though of course I used to be crazy about Billy Woods; and then once I was engaged to another man for a long time, and I was perfectly devoted to him, but he never made me feel a single thrilly thrill. And would you believe it, Mr. Townsend?—after a while he came back, precisely as though he had been a bad penny ...
— The Cords of Vanity • James Branch Cabell et al

... it! The bags were distributed by a number of men wearing the dark overcoats and uniform caps of the Salvation Army! That's how they managed to get through with the business without arousing the curiosity of the police. I don't know how many of them there were, but I should imagine twenty or thirty. They ...
— The Sins of Severac Bablon • Sax Rohmer

... causes to which earthquakes are assigned. With those due to rock-falls in subterranean channels, we need have little to do. The shocks are invariably slight, and the part they play in the shaping of the earth's crust is insignificant. Volcanic earthquakes possess a higher degree of interest. They represent, no doubt, incipient or unsuccessful attempts to produce an eruption. They may be the forerunners of ...
— A Study of Recent Earthquakes • Charles Davison

... through the creek into Lake Romano," said the twins' father. "That is a much larger lake. We'll spend most of our houseboat vacation there. We will also visit ...
— The Bobbsey Twins on a Houseboat • Laura Lee Hope

... night-raven sings; There, under ebon shades and low-browed rocks As ragged as thy locks, In dark Cimmerian desert ever dwell. But come, thou Goddess fair and free, In Heaven yclept Euphrosyne, And by men, heart-easing Mirth; Whom lovely Venus, at a birth With two sister Graces more, To ivy-crowned Bacchus bore; Or whether, as some sager sing, The frolic wind that breathes the spring, Zephyr, with Aurora playing, As he met her once a-maying, There, on beds of violets blue, And fresh-blown roses washed in ...
— The Hundred Best English Poems • Various

... shall we do?" Sylvia went on, drawing herself up and setting her teeth together until she could conquer that weak desire for tears, which would be sure to lower her dreadfully in the eyes of the boys and would do no good at all. "The house seemed embarrassingly small at first, but now that it is a stranger who is master, and not Father at all, why, the whole thing ...
— The Adventurous Seven - Their Hazardous Undertaking • Bessie Marchant

... It is not well to move a sleeping lion. Yet, if either hereabouts or elsewhere in the novel, any disagreeable reader should find out something or other not quite in the spirit of our manners—or rather inartificial in the conduct ...
— Walladmor: - And Now Freely Translated from the German into English. - In Two Volumes. Vol. II. • Thomas De Quincey

... would it be wise to pass through life without a protector? Her destiny must be united with a fate as exceptional as her own. Such a one could hardly be found in our village, and in Paris we knew no one. It was about the time when these anxieties occupied our minds that your mother came ...
— Jack - 1877 • Alphonse Daudet

... you're born!" replied Zeke. "That was just what they were there for. The only thing that saved me was my havin' my mother along. 'Twasn't long afterward before I heard of a man being held up just as I was. Two men came along in a buggy and locked wheels with him and while he was trying to help himself out of the fix one of them dropped him with the butt of his gun and went through his pockets and all his belongings. ...
— The Go Ahead Boys and Simon's Mine • Ross Kay

... snuff which has been exposed to these insects; for the eggs sometimes hatch in two hours, and the most tremendous consequences might follow. And it is not impossible that some of the most painful diseases to which the human race are liable, may have been occasionally produced by this or a similar cause. The ...
— The Young Man's Guide • William A. Alcott

... to believe that they were urged on by some higher and greater power. Who knows? Perhaps by certain indiscreet persons in the service of the King of France. The condemnation and death of Jeanne was a serious attack upon the prestige of Charles VII. May he not have had in his household or among his counsellors certain subjects who were rashly jealous enough to invent this appearance, in order to spread ...
— The Life of Joan of Arc, Vol. 1 and 2 (of 2) • Anatole France

... man and all his villains stood and watched her walk away from them to the stable. They watched her lead Pard out and turn him loose in the biggest corral. When they saw her take her coiled rope, mount the sorrel and ride in, they went, in a hurried group, to where they might look into that corral. They watched her pull the gate shut after her, lean from the saddle, and fasten the chain hook in its accustomed link. By the time she had widened her loop and turned to charge down upon unsuspecting Pard, Robert Grant Burns, his leading ...
— Jean of the Lazy A • B. M. Bower

... Pope, who fled, accompanied by his retinue, at a headlong gallop to Rome, never drawing bridle until he reached the safe seclusion ...
— Sea-Wolves of the Mediterranean • E. Hamilton Currey

... had been a slight rise in the Kanawha River, so that it was possible to use small steamboats to carry supplies for the troops, and Lightburn was ordered to advance his whole division to Red House, twenty-five miles, ...
— Military Reminiscences of the Civil War V1 • Jacob Dolson Cox

... of January, 1896, a little before twelve o'clock in the day, I discover a numerous troop making their way up and gradually reaching the popular cornice. Slowly, in single file, the caterpillars climb the great vase, mount the ledge and advance in regular procession, while others are ...
— The Wonders of Instinct • J. H. Fabre

... for the Pacific Coast's aversion to the Hindu, and even with the arguments stated explicitly, there is a ...
— The Canadian Commonwealth • Agnes C. Laut

... frightened bird in your hand, and felt its heart beat? That is the way Bernice's heart was going. She was a stranger. Her father had moved to this place from a distant town, and she had walked to school that morning with a pupil who lived on the same street, but who had fluttered away into a little bevy of children almost as soon as she had shown the ...
— Stories Worth Rereading • Various

... minutes' deliberation, returned a verdict, finding the prisoner "Not Guilty," on grounds as unimpeachable as the trial. In some of the circumstances attending and resulting from it, it was disgraceful, especially on the part of the medical witnesses for the crown, in their ...
— Recollections of Old Liverpool • A Nonagenarian

... events were on the gale, And each hour brought a varying tale, And the demeanour, changed and cold, Of Douglas fretted Marmion bold, And, like the impatient steed of war He snuffed the battle from afar; And hopes were none, that back again Herald should come from Terouenne, Where England's king in leaguer lay, Before decisive ...
— Marmion: A Tale of Flodden Field • Walter Scott

... of the wrapper which comes with this book, you will find a wonderful list of stories which you can buy at the same store where you got ...
— Ralph on the Engine - The Young Fireman of the Limited Mail • Allen Chapman

... after leaving Narnia spent the days of the Saturnalian holiday[213] quietly at Ocriculum.[214] The object of this disastrous delay was to wait for Mucianus. Antonius has been suspected of delaying treacherously after receiving a secret communication from Vitellius, offering him as the price of treason the consulship, his young daughter, and a rich dowry. Others hold that this story was invented to gratify Mucianus. Many consider that the policy of all the Flavian generals was rather to threaten the city than to attack it. ...
— Tacitus: The Histories, Volumes I and II • Caius Cornelius Tacitus

... had been a seat of the Duke of Buckingham's, which was bought by George II., and in the next reign was settled on Queen Charlotte instead of Somerset House, and called the "Queen's House." It was rebuilt by George IV. but not occupied by him, and had been rarely used by King William. Besides ...
— Life of Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen V.1. • Sarah Tytler

... remembrance of her sins came heavy upon her, she gave a loud cry and covered her face with ...
— The Story and Song of Black Roderick • Dora Sigerson

... of the shepherds to Mary, already recited, was succeeded by another, perhaps equally remarkable. A company of Magi, or Magians, [9] probably from Arabia, having seen a remarkable light, resembling a star, suspended over Bethlehem, hastened to pay suitable homage to the illustrious personage whose birth it indicated. These philosophers, who were particularly addicted to the study ...
— Female Scripture Biographies, Vol. II • Francis Augustus Cox

... forever free. Let them go down into the pit of eternal oblivion. Let there be no phantom rising from the grave of buried sins to affright us. Looking to the Christ, their power is all gone. Oh, what a relief this is! See how men are driven by an accusing conscience—longing for deliverance from themselves, since in themselves they carry the executioner of broken law. Hear them crying out for waters of Lethe ...
— Joy in Service; Forgetting, and Pressing Onward; Until the Day Dawn • George Tybout Purves

... of alcohol be taken into the stomach, it will be absorbed there, but, previous to absorption, it will have to undergo a proper degree of dilution with water, for there is this peculiarity respecting alcohol when it is separated by an animal membrane from a watery fluid like the blood, that it will not pass through the membrane until it has become charged, to a given point of dilution, with water. It is itself, ...
— Grappling with the Monster • T. S. Arthur

... we had only to age the individuals into adult and subadult classes. The criterion for adult status was breeding capability. A five-millimeter testis was the smallest size found in individuals that probably bred, and all of these were 40 mm. or more in snout-vent length. We arbitrarily considered individuals smaller than 40 mm. to be subadult. This probably does injustice to reality (females were treated ...
— Natural History of the Salamander, Aneides hardii • Richard F. Johnston

... A good encouragement to all rulers in the house of God, and also to all godly parents, to teach and rule in the fear of God; for that is the way to part with church-members and children with comfort; yea, that is the way, if we shall outlive ...
— The Riches of Bunyan • Jeremiah Rev. Chaplin

... elapsed between the publication of my first and the commencement of my second volume; and the causes must be assigned of this long delay. 1. After a short holiday, I indulged my curiosity in some studies of a very different nature, a course of anatomy, which was demonstrated by Doctor Hunter; and some lessons of chymistry, which were delivered by Mr. Higgins. The principles ...
— Memoirs of My Life and Writings • Edward Gibbon

... for the present. Don't you see, little one, I talked after my kind, just as you talk after your kind. It's only on the surface with both of us. Why, I daresay some of your good Hollingford ladies talk of the poor people in a manner which they would consider as impertinent in their turn, if they could hear it. But I ought to be more considerate when I remember how often my blood has boiled at the modes of speech and behaviour of one of my aunts, ...
— Wives and Daughters • Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

... loch, when we emerged from the hills, there was a cluster of whin-bushes spread out upon a machar of land that in a less rigorous season of the year, by the feel of the shoe-sole, must be velvet-piled with salty grass. It lay in the clear, grey forenoon like a garden ...
— John Splendid - The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn • Neil Munro

... all this from a higher standpoint than his wife; at least such an attitude on his part was to be inferred from his increased solemnity. He committed himself to no precipitate elation at the idea of his daughter's being taken up by a patroness of movements who happened to ...
— The Bostonians, Vol. I (of II) • Henry James

... through to God and makes us feel like giants in his strength. If you would be strengthened in your soul, you must exercise. This is the law of development in the spiritual as well as in the animal life. "Exercise thyself unto godliness." This is a motto we should hang upon the walls of our memory. Its meaning is that increase in godliness is attained only ...
— How to Live a Holy Life • C. E. Orr

... energy or capacity to defend himself, Cesar nevertheless had the courage to look his position in the face. To meet the payments on his house and on his loans, and to pay his rents and his current expenses, he required, between the end of December and the fifteenth of January, a sum of sixty thousand francs, half of which must be obtained before the thirtieth of December. All his resources put together gave him a scant twenty thousand; he lacked ten thousand francs for the first payments. To his mind the position did not ...
— Rise and Fall of Cesar Birotteau • Honore de Balzac

... certainly well adapted for his work. He could edit his paper with a clear appreciation of the kind of matter which would best conduce to its success, and he could write telling leading articles himself. He was indefatigable, unscrupulous, and devoted to his paper. ...
— Phineas Redux • Anthony Trollope

... downward a few feet, and when they looked at the place where it had been they discovered what seemed to be a small iron door, built into the solid stone underneath, and now shown to their view by the ...
— Twinkle and Chubbins - Their Astonishing Adventures in Nature-Fairyland • L. Frank (Lyman Frank) Baum

... already stated that the Tonquin set sail from the mouth of the river on the fifth of June. The whole number of persons on board amounted to twenty-three. In one of the outer bays they picked up, from a fishing canoe, an Indian named Lamazee, who had already made two voyages along the coast and knew something of the language of the various tribes. He agreed to accompany them ...
— Astoria - Or, Anecdotes Of An Enterprise Beyond The Rocky Mountains • Washington Irving

... a blue sky spread over with wings, And a mild Sun that mounts & sings; With trees & fields full of Fairy elves, And little devils who ...
— Mysticism in English Literature • Caroline F. E. Spurgeon

... commencement of the deluge to its close was therefore twelve lunar months and ten days; i. e. 364 or 365 days. The beginning of the rain would, no doubt, be sharply marked; the end of the drying would be gradual, and hence the selection of a day exactly (so far as we can tell) a full tropical year from the beginning of the flood would seem to be intentional. A complete year had been consumed by ...
— The Astronomy of the Bible - An Elementary Commentary on the Astronomical References - of Holy Scripture • E. Walter Maunder

... of success may best be approached by a clearly defined idea of what success itself means, what it stands for to us, what proportion of our real life it represents. Success is the watchword of American life—one might almost, indeed, say that it is ...
— The Life Radiant • Lilian Whiting

... of the islanders. Thus the utmost cordiality was preserved throughout. The Japanese received the presents from the American government with delight, and were quite overcome at the sight of the steam-engine and the magnetic telegraph. A series of agreeable entertainments followed the signing of the treaty, in which the Japanese showed themselves especially alive to the civilizing influences of foreign cookery, and appreciation of such refinements as whiskey and Champagne, to whose beneficent influences they ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 5, No. 32, June, 1860 • Various

... and departed to join and fight with his king. Assuming the cowl and robes of one of the lay brothers, and removing the red wig and beard he had adopted with his former costume, the young lord took the staff in his hand, and with difficulty bringing his hasty pace to a level with the sober step and grave demeanor of a reverend monk, reached Stirling just as the cavalcade, with the litter intended for the captive countess, had assembled before the castle gate. Agitated almost beyond the power of control, Douglas ...
— The Days of Bruce Vol 1 - A Story from Scottish History • Grace Aguilar

... the forest thick and tangled, but rather like an open park, so that among the trees were great stretches of ground wanting only to be tilled. Twenty of Cartier's men were set to turn the soil, and in one day had prepared and sown about an acre and a half of ground. The cabbage, lettuce, and turnip seed that they planted showed green shoots within ...
— The Mariner of St. Malo: A Chronicle of the Voyages of Jacques Cartier • Stephen Leacock

... THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS ARTICLE 198a A Committee consisting of representatives of regional and local bodies, hereinafter referred to as "the Committee of the Regions", is hereby established with advisory status. The number of members of the Committee of the Regions shall be as follows: Belgium 12 Denmark 9 Germany 24 ...
— The Treaty of the European Union, Maastricht Treaty, 7th February, 1992 • European Union

... day passed pleasantly at Vaccarizza. I became the guest of a prosperous resident, and was treated to genuine Albanian hospitality and excellent cheer. I only wish that all his compatriots might enjoy one meal of this kind in their lifetime. For they are poor, and their homes of miserable aspect. Like all too many villages in South Italy, this one is depopulated ...
— Old Calabria • Norman Douglas

... substance, cannot be in two species, one of which is not subordinate to the other. But in respect of those things which are superadded to the substance, one thing can be contained under different species. Thus one and the same fruit, as to its color, is contained under one species, i.e. a white thing: and, as to its perfume, under the species of sweet-smelling things. In like manner an action which, as to its substance, is in one natural species, considered in respect to the moral conditions that are added to it, can belong to two species, as stated ...
— Summa Theologica, Part I-II (Pars Prima Secundae) - From the Complete American Edition • Saint Thomas Aquinas

... heard the young man's story and knew the passion and transport and love-longing that afflicted him, he was moved to compassion and wonder and said, 'Glory be to God who hath appointed to every thing a cause!' Than they craved the young man's leave to depart; which being granted, they took leave of him, the Khalif purposing to do him justice and entreat him with the utmost munificence, and returned to the palace of the Khalifate, where they changed their clothes for others befitting ...
— The Book Of The Thousand Nights And One Night, Volume III • Anonymous

... afterwards, all at court was in disorder,—armed men supplied the service of young girls, and Sibyll, with a purse of broad pieces, soon converted into manuscripts, was sent back to her father's desolate home. There had she grown a flower amidst ruins, with no companion of her own age, and left to bear, as her sweet and affectionate nature well ...
— The Last Of The Barons, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... question of locking up had been discussed in full conclave the day after her month of preparation ended, the sisters taking opposite sides, as might have been expected. Selina was for the immediate introduction of a locksmith and a ...
— Mistress and Maid • Dinah Craik (aka: Miss Mulock)

... day, at my own house, a little fellow, a native of Nantes, born without arms, who has so well taught his feet to perform the services his hands should have done him, that truly these have half forgotten their natural office; and, indeed, the fellow calls them his hands; with them he cuts anything, charges and ...
— The Essays of Montaigne, Complete • Michel de Montaigne

... there seems little for you to do here. Go to Cleveland, if you like, and seek some respectable employment. If, after a time, you find your longing for the sea unconquered, it will be time to look out for a ...
— From Canal Boy to President - Or The Boyhood and Manhood of James A. Garfield • Horatio Alger, Jr.

... Moon told me. "The public applaud vociferously directly they see him. Every one of his movements is comic, and is sure to throw the house into convulsions of laughter; and yet there is no art in it all—it is complete nature. When he was yet a little boy, playing about with other boys, he was already Punch. Nature had intended him for it, and had provided him with a hump on his back, and another on his breast; but his inward man, his mind, on the contrary, was richly ...
— What the Moon Saw: and Other Tales • Hans Christian Andersen

... cost her an hour of hard toil to write this little letter, and when it was written she felt that it was cold, ungrateful, unloving,—very unlike the words which he would feel that he had a right to expect from her. Nevertheless, such as it was, she gave it to her friend Fanny, with many injunctions that it might, if possible, be placed in the hands of Ludovic. And thus, as she told herself repeatedly on her way home, the romance of her life was over. ...
— Linda Tressel • Anthony Trollope

... well as the eggs which they contain, undergo, at particular seasons, a periodical development, or increase in growth.... At the approach of the generative season, in all the lower animals, a certain number of the eggs, which were previously in an imperfect and inactive condition, begin to increase in size and ...
— Plain Facts for Old and Young • John Harvey Kellogg

... all innovators, but who acts calmly and almost without being perceived. This happiness does not belong to colonies when they reach the critical juncture of emancipation; and least of all to Spanish America, engaged in the struggle at first not to obtain complete independence, but to escape from a foreign yoke. May these party agitations be succeeded by a lasting tranquillity! May the germ of civil discord, disseminated during three centuries to secure the dominion of the mother-country, gradually ...
— Equinoctial Regions of America V3 • Alexander von Humboldt

... had passed came a servant from the palace, and told Hans that he must give her a hare instantly, for some visitors had come unexpectedly. Hans, however, was very well aware what that meant, and said he would not give her one; the King might set some hare soup before his guest next day. The maid, however, would ...
— Household Tales by Brothers Grimm • Grimm Brothers

... Ginevra before he left, but had no chance. He had gone to the North church every Sunday for a long time now, neither for love of Fergus, nor dislike to Mr. Sclater, but for the sake of seeing his lost friend: had he not lost her when she turned from Donal to Fergus? Did she not forsake him too when she forsook his Donal? His heart would rise into his throat at ...
— Sir Gibbie • George MacDonald

... paid. He had expected to be revived and to disappear with Anginette Phelps long before this. Should the confederates of Phelps wait? They did not dare. To wait longer might be to sacrifice him, if indeed they had not taken a long chance already. Besides, you yourself had your suspicions and had written the ...
— The Dream Doctor • Arthur B. Reeve

... girl, cry no more, you make yourself too ugly!" said the Baron, "Now, be a little reasonable. Go sensibly home, and I promise you that Wenceslas shall never set foot in that woman's house. I ask you to make the sacrifice, if it is a sacrifice to forgive the husband you love so ...
— Cousin Betty • Honore de Balzac

... about the pictures lay mossy, gnarled, and twisted branches, gray and green, framing them in a forest arabesque; and great pine cones, pendent from their boughs, crowned ...
— A Summer in Leslie Goldthwaite's Life. • Mrs. A. D. T. Whitney

... and father," said the Sub-Prior, "your words pierce my very soul. Under the seal of confession will I presently tell thee why I conceive myself rather the baffled sport of a spirit of another sort, than the protected favourite of the heavenly powers. But first let me ask this unhappy man a question ...
— The Monastery • Sir Walter Scott

... noble,—live happily—die calmly: are remembered with perpetual honour by their race, and for the perpetual good of it. All wise men know and have known these things, since the form of man was separated from the dust. The knowledge and enforcement of them have nothing to do with religion: a good and wise man differs from a bad and idiotic one, simply as a good dog from a cur, and as any manner of dog from a wolf or a weasel. And if you are to believe in, or preach without half believing in, a ...
— Our Fathers Have Told Us - Part I. The Bible of Amiens • John Ruskin

... you all resolu'd to giue your voyces? But that's no matter, the greater part carries it, I say. If hee would incline to the people, there was neuer a worthier man. Enter Coriolanus in a gowne of Humility, ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... we planned to do. We told him we must have subjects for measurement, photographing and modeling. He showed no great enthusiasm in the matter. One and another came to be measured, if they chose, but a number entirely refused. It was plain that something must be done. Quitting my work, I sent orders for the presidente to appear, and, after an intolerable delay, he presented himself. I told him that we were losing time; that subjects were not presenting themselves; ...
— In Indian Mexico (1908) • Frederick Starr

... send word by mail, as Jake rode to Oak Creek two or three times a week, and could mail a note from them if they were to ...
— Polly and Eleanor • Lillian Elizabeth Roy

... young man in Worthington," she informed him, "is a phenomenon, a social phenomenon. Of course he may be a freak, also," ...
— The Clarion • Samuel Hopkins Adams

... an' save you, my lady," said the woman, almost frightening Clara by the sudden way in which she came forward, "an' you too, Misther Herbert; and for the love of heaven do something for a poor crathur whose five starving childher have not had wholesome food within their lips for the last ...
— Castle Richmond • Anthony Trollope

... were concluded, she retired to the castle of Udolpho, whither the Marquis followed, and, where her conduct, relaxing from the propriety, which she had lately assumed, discovered to him the precipice, on which he stood. A minuter enquiry than he had before thought it necessary to make, convinced him, that he had been deceived in her character, and she, whom he had designed for his wife, ...
— The Mysteries of Udolpho • Ann Radcliffe

... and drawing the little girl to a seat on her knee, they talked sweetly together of the race they were running, and the prize they hoped to obtain at the end of it; of the battle they were fighting, and the invisible foes with whom they were called to struggle—the armor that had been provided, and of Him ...
— Elsie Dinsmore • Martha Finley

... the putting on record an implacability that was confessedly impotent. This was the very lunacy of malice. Mortifying it might certainly seem for the members of a supreme court, like the General Assembly, to be baffled by those of a subordinate court: but still, since each party must be regarded as representing far larger interests than any personal to themselves, trying on either side, not the energies of their ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 55, No. 340, February, 1844 • Various

... "Yes," said Aurora in a voice that sounded pale, even as her face looked pale. "I have understood, and I won't come again. Just one thing, Gerald. Put your arms under the bed clothes and ...
— Aurora the Magnificent • Gertrude Hall

... the tense anger and suspicion die swiftly out of his eyes. The death of a relative, necessarily postponing Nan's marriage, appealed to that curious conventional strain in ...
— The Moon out of Reach • Margaret Pedler

... of the child of a well-connected British shareholder inheriting, let us say, seven or eight hundred a year, with the home of exactly the same sort of person deriving from the middle class. On the one hand, one will find the old aristocratic British tradition in an instructively distorted state. All the assumptions ...
— Mankind in the Making • H. G. Wells

... boast a white more soft, 25 The spell hath so perfumd thee, That careless Love shall deem thee oft A blossom from his Myrtle tree. Then, laughing at the fair deceit, Shall race with some Etesian wind 30 To seek the woven ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Vol I and II • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... Interior. Attempts to Discover a Route between South and Western Australia. Eyre's Disastrous Journey. Leichardt, the Lost Explorer. The ...
— Explorations in Australia • John Forrest

... wide silent marshes such passing is strange enough. But here I stood above a sleeping city of men, and far above me, so far that I could only hear them, holding their northward way through the starlit sky, they passed—whither? and how guided? Was the shining dome of the State House a beacon? Did they mark the light ...
— Roof and Meadow • Dallas Lore Sharp

... have married them off younger if he had known how numbers were going to count some day among the Westonhaughs." And he laughed again in a way I should certainly have felt it my business to resent, if my indignation as well as the ill-timed allusions which had called it forth had not been put to an end by a fresh arrival through the veiling mist which hung like ...
— The House in the Mist • Anna Katharine Green

... Fox, and began to cry harder. Granny Fox looked at Reddy sharply. "What have you been doing now—tearing your clothes on a barbed-wire fence or trying to crawl through a bull-briar thicket? I should think you were big enough by this time to look out for yourself!" said Granny Fox crossly, as she came over to look ...
— The Adventures of Reddy Fox • Thornton W. Burgess

... as if imitation were a separate principle in mental growth, and there have been many to state this. As is well known Tarde made it a leading factor in human development. It seems to me that it is linked up with desire for experience, desire for fellowship, ...
— The Foundations of Personality • Abraham Myerson

... the distance of a century, the Royalist combination for the suppression of equality before the law, as finally evolved in 1792, did not so much lack military intelligence, as it lacked any approximate comprehension of the modern mind. The Royalists proposed to reestablish privilege, and to ...
— The Theory of Social Revolutions • Brooks Adams

... Once put him on trial and you must go through with it to the end. A deposed king will be like a keg of gunpowder set by your hearth. You cannot hide him so that he ceases to be a peril. You cannot ...
— The Path of the King • John Buchan

... to promise," said Joe when I taxed him with it. "I couldn't help it. I would ha' sworn black was white, the mistress have got that way with her. Thinks I to myself, 'Mr. Bold beant a baby, nor I beant a nurse; but I'll commit black perjury to make her happy,' and ...
— Humphrey Bold - A Story of the Times of Benbow • Herbert Strang

... ended. A faint outline of the history of a true hero has been traced. From it may be learned in what true heroism consists. William Penn (for he is our real hero), like the Master he served, though in the world, was not of it. He, as all must who desire to be faithful ...
— A True Hero - A Story of the Days of William Penn • W.H.G. Kingston

... you what it is, boys," he whispered, as he gave Waggie a mournful pat; "if we don't want to be buried in an Atlanta graveyard we ...
— Chasing an Iron Horse - Or, A Boy's Adventures in the Civil War • Edward Robins

... you must use a silk handkerchief. Twisting it, rope- fashion, and grasping it by the middle with both hands. You must request one of the spectators to tie the two ends together. He does so, but you tell him he has not tied them half tight enough, and you yourself pull them still tighter. ...
— Healthful Sports for Boys • Alfred Rochefort

... laughed her mother. "Rose, will you take Margy to the water tank and get her a drink? Be careful, and hold on to the arms of the seats so you don't fall ...
— Six Little Bunkers at Grandpa Ford's • Laura Lee Hope

... whether or not there had been a colony of Europeans, with African slaves in America, ...
— The Journal of Negro History, Volume 5, 1920 • Various

... Luke names his brother Andrew, probably a man of less ability and strength, but one who will ever be remembered as having brought Peter into fellowship with Jesus. None can ever tell what share in the reward of a more famous worker will be enjoyed by ...
— The Gospel of Luke, An Exposition • Charles R. Erdman

... and climbed into a nearby jet boat. The enlisted spaceman at the controls sent the tiny vessel skimming across the broad expanse of the spaceport toward the ...
— Treachery in Outer Space • Carey Rockwell and Louis Glanzman

... very obstinate and very unwilling to entertain the thought of drudgery such as nursing after all their dreams of excitement; but at last they came to reason, and I sent for a cab and packed them off in it (I simply could not bear the idea of other people seeing them in that masquerade), and told them that the ...
— A Boswell of Baghdad - With Diversions • E. V. Lucas

... the pack is firmly lashed, the animal supports his burden better and travels with greater ease, which seems quite probable, as the tension forms, as it were, an external sheath supporting and bracing the muscles. It also has a tendency to prevent the saddle from slipping and chafing the mule's back. With such huge cargas as the Mexicans load upon their mules, it is impossible, by any precautions, to prevent their backs ...
— The Prairie Traveler - A Hand-book for Overland Expeditions • Randolph Marcy

... turned his head toward the woods, while he held his lips closed over his pipe-stem. The sharp report of a rifle had reached their ears, and the two Pawnees listened for a minute without moving or speaking. Deerfoot just then was doing wonders in the way of dodging and running, and the warriors sitting by the camp-fire could almost read the ...
— Footprints in the Forest • Edward Sylvester Ellis

... charges upon the same horse and wrapped them about in the same gaudy serape till only two pair of pretty eyes peeped forth at the rain. The Vera Cruz highway clung to the mountain side, but the Contra Guerrillas took a venturesome little bridle path which dropped abruptly down into the rich valley of a thousand or more feet below. Emerging from the dense tropical growth of the highland, they beheld a vast emerald checkerboard of cultivation, field after field ...
— The Missourian • Eugene P. (Eugene Percy) Lyle

... the procession was leaving the stage, and Elsa was sitting on the bed alone. Still no Lohengrin. The violins arrived at the muted chord of B flat, which is Lohengrin's cue. They hung on it for a second, and then the conductor dropped his baton. A bell rang. The curtain descended. The lights were turned up, and there was a swift loosing of tongues in the house. People were pointing to Sir Cyril in our box. As for him, he seemed ...
— The Ghost - A Modern Fantasy • Arnold Bennett

... thirty or forty years, that tract of country will have assumed the rank which naturally belongs to it. It is easy to calculate that its population, compared to that of the coast of the Atlantic, will be, in round numbers, as 40 to 11. In a few years the States which founded the Union will lose the direction of its policy, and the population of the valley of the Mississippi will preponderate ...
— Democracy In America, Volume 1 (of 2) • Alexis de Tocqueville

... a scene such as is beheld by infants in their slumbers, when they dream of paradise!" said Glenn, paying no attention to Joe, his eyes immovably riveted on the innumerable sprigs of alabaster which pointed out in every direction in profuse clusters, while his pale lips seemed ...
— Wild Western Scenes • John Beauchamp Jones

... from the general conflagration the FUTURE WHICH IS WITHIN YOU. To each word of hatred uttered by the combatants, make answer by an act of kindness and love toward all the victims. Let your simple presence show a calm disavowal of errant passions; make of yourselves onlookers whose luminous and compassionate gaze compels us to blush at our own unreason. Amid war, be the living embodiment of peace. Be the undying Antigone, who renounces hatred, and who makes no ...
— The Forerunners • Romain Rolland

... had seen come hurtling over the precipice in company with the herd of blesbok happened to be lying in such a position that I could get at him without very much difficulty, and I determined to have his hide if upon examination it should prove worth taking. Accordingly, upon the arrival of Piet, we both clambered up on the mound of dead and dying animals until we reached the spot where the lion ...
— Through Veld and Forest - An African Story • Harry Collingwood

... indulgence, grounded at once on contempt and jealousy, has a tendency gradually to produce something better and more liberal, I cannot tell, for want of having the actual map of the country. If this should be the case, it was right in you to accept it, such as it is. ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. IV. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... as she saw the rusty band, and guessed why it was there; but she found it difficult to repress a smile when she beheld the cambric symbol of woe on the dog's neck. Not a word was said to disturb the boy's comfort in these poor attempts, however, and he went out to do his chores conscious that he was an object of interest ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, V. 5, April 1878 - Scribner's Illustrated • Various

... with a shake of his head. "You fellows have been out for some time this morning. You'll have to give us time to warm ...
— The High School Boys' Canoe Club • H. Irving Hancock

... have transpired since my last annual message has but served to confirm the opinion then expressed of the propriety of making provision by a retired list for disabled officers and for increased compensation to the officers retained on the list for active duty. All the reasons which existed when these measures were recommended on former occasions continue without modification, except so far as circumstances have given to some of ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 3 (of 4) of Volume 5: Franklin Pierce • James D. Richardson

... had been erected in a wild part of the country by some zealous missionary, who prided himself upon the number of his converts. He left his chapel during a few weeks' absence in some other district, during which time his converts paid their devotion to the Christian altar. They had ...
— The Rifle and The Hound in Ceylon • Samuel White Baker



Words linked to "A" :   do a job on, tete-a-tete, catch a wink, grind to a halt, get a look, hang by a hair, get a load, hemophilia A, shoot a line, Thomas a Becket, take a joke, give it a whirl, a good deal, two-a-penny, a cappella, A-line, take a powder, Thomas a Kempis, hang by a thread, take a dive, even a little, take a firm stand, to a lower place, in a broad way, a-ok, smart as a whip, 5-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, a la carte, beyond a doubt, at a loss, characteristic root of a square matrix, turn a nice penny, blood group, give it a try, make a point, rub-a-dub, eigenvalue of a matrix, A-bomb, have a bun in the oven, chlorophyll a, element of a cone, not by a long sight, strike a note, bric-a-brac, a la mode, A-horizon, a fortiori, botulinum toxin A, A level, coenzyme A, A-team, feel like a million dollars, range of a function, picometre, in a pig's eye, a bit, al-Gama'a al-Islamiyya, eigenvalue of a square matrix, not by a blame sight, hardly a, pull a fast one on, cock-a-leekie, paint a picture, a couple of, make a face, blood type, to a fault, for a song, antiophthalmic factor, turn a nice dime, imaginary part of a complex number, degree of a polynomial, ring-a-rosy, rent-a-car, have a ball, a cappella singing, current unit, play a trick on, micromillimeter, drag a bunt, after a fashion, get a whiff, to a higher place, rat-a-tat-tat, term of a contract, letter, take a dare, rope-a-dope, take a hop, one at a time, A'man, forever and a day, in a similar way, have a go at it, turn a trick, a hundred times, moment of a couple, take a shit, character-at-a-time printer, on a higher floor, draw a blank, give a damn, abatement of a nuisance, retinol, in a beastly manner, adenine, Linear A, to a greater extent, a capella singing, take a leak, A battery, love-in-a-mist, object of a preposition, draw a line, for a bargain price, lobster a la Newburg, blow a fuse, hepatitis A virus, a-okay, have a go, in a nutshell, as a group, get a noseful, strike a blow, to a lesser extent, take a chance, all of a sudden, roman a clef, by a long shot, make a clean breast of, A-one, throw a fit, get a line, son of a bitch, page-at-a-time printer, half a dozen, type A, moment of a magnet, at a low price, turn a nice dollar, take a crap, to a T, without a stitch, feel like a million, have a good time, touch a chord, in a bad way, a few, A-scan ultrasonography, high-muck-a-muck, at a lower place, pull a face, beyond a shadow of a doubt, time and a half, as a matter of fact, in a higher place, catch a glimpse, ampere, cap-a-pie, a priori, go a long way, micromicron, give a hoot, axerophthol, biochemistry, ring-around-a-rosy, for a while, element of a cylinder, cock-a-doodle-doo, a trifle, St. Thomas a Becket, deoxyadenosine monophosphate, vitamin A, micromillimetre, a posteriori, turn a blind eye, rat-a-tat, vis-a-vis, quite a little, immunoglobulin A, many a, haemophilia A, send a message, make a motion, Saint Thomas a Becket, nm, a million times, deaf as a post, like a shot, once in a while, tete a tete, Al-Jama'a al-Islamiyyah al-Muqatilah bi-Libya, line-at-a-time printer, turn a loss, dehydroretinol, bright as a new penny, raise a stink, picometer, explode a bombshell, draw a bead on, jack-a-lantern, beat a retreat, angstrom, in a low voice, man-on-a-horse, nucleotide, angstrom unit, take a breather, chock-a-block, broth of a boy, give a hang, naked as a jaybird, care a hang, at a time, take a bow, degree of a term, millimicron, take a hit, play a joke on, pied-a-terre, purine, a little, turn on a dime, in a flash, make a stink, call it a day, a great deal, group A, take a breath, on a lower floor, as a formality, menage a trois, strike a chord, quite a, in a heartfelt way, pate a choux



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