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A   Listen
article
A  indefinite artic.  
1.
An adjective, commonly called the indefinite article, and signifying one or any, but less emphatically. "At a birth"; "In a word"; "At a blow". Note: It is placed before nouns of the singular number denoting an individual object, or a quality individualized, before collective nouns, and also before plural nouns when the adjective few or the phrase great many or good many is interposed; as, a dog, a house, a man; a color; a sweetness; a hundred, a fleet, a regiment; a few persons, a great many days. It is used for an, for the sake of euphony, before words beginning with a consonant sound (for exception of certain words beginning with h, see An); as, a table, a woman, a year, a unit, a eulogy, a ewe, a oneness, such a one, etc. Formally an was used both before vowels and consonants.
2.
In each; to or for each; as, "twenty leagues a day", "a hundred pounds a year", "a dollar a yard", etc.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"A" Quotes from Famous Books



... Greece was of unrivalled grandeur—surpassing Italy, perhaps every country in the world. It combined in the highest degree every feature essential to the highest beauty of a landscape except, perhaps, large rivers. But this was more than compensated for by the proximity of the sea, which, by its numerous arms, seemed to embrace the land on nearly every side. Its mountains, encircled with zones ...
— Christianity and Greek Philosophy • Benjamin Franklin Cocker

... you have desired a son. This conjugal annoyance is the only one that makes you beside yourself with joy. For your rejuvenated wife has attained what must be called the Indian Summer of women; she nurses, she has a full breast of milk! Her complexion is ...
— Petty Troubles of Married Life, Part First • Honore de Balzac

... breugach, bosdail, Beular sinn, gorach, gun seadh, Lasgair gasd e Chloinn Domhnuill, Mac Ailein Mhoir as a Mhagh. Chuir e botul neo-ghortach a' m' dhorn, A chur iotadh mo sgornain air chul, 'S bard gun tur a bh' air a' chordadh Nach do sheinn gu mor a chliu. Ach tha 'n seors' ud uile cho caillteach, Cho mi-thaingeil, 's cho beag ciall, 'S ma thig a' chuach idir o 'n ceann, ...
— The Celtic Magazine, Vol. 1, No. 1, November 1875 • Various

... lymphatic glands is to be obtained from those cases in which we find an increase of the lymphocytes in the blood. These "lymphocytoses" occur, in comparison with other leucocytoses, relatively seldom. Under certain conditions in which a hyperplasia of the lymphatic glandular apparatus makes its appearance, we often see at first an increase of the lymphocytes in the blood. Ehrlich and Karewski in some unpublished work have investigated ...
— Histology of the Blood - Normal and Pathological • Paul Ehrlich

... both sides, the correct solution of the problem, strategical or tactical, is generally so plain that we may easily be led to believe that it must needs have spontaneously suggested itself to the victorious leader; and, as a natural corollary, that success is due rather to force of will than to force of intellect; to vigilance, energy, and audacity, rather than to insight and calculation. It is asserted, for instance, by superficial ...
— Stonewall Jackson And The American Civil War • G. F. R. Henderson

... to prophesy her marriage: how silly! She was only too much married! That was not what she wanted to know; but the Astrarium! the Astrarium! Would she be there or would she not? The New Trickers were plotting to get there, with a turn which she had given them, goose that she was; and Cousin Daisy, that farthing dip, would triumph and not she, a star, a real one! Lily was rather in the position of Pa, when he arrived in London from New York ... with this difference, that Pa had money and Lily had none. But there was ...
— The Bill-Toppers • Andre Castaigne

... of the quotes is intentional to indicate both the end of a quotation and the beginning of a new paragraph as presented in the ...
— Was Man Created? • Henry A. Mott

... in the city, Locket's was pre-eminently the resort of the "smart set." The prices charged are proof enough of THAT, even though they were not always paid. The case of Sir George Ethrege is one in point. That dissolute dramatist and diplomat of the Restoration period was a frequent customer at Locket's until his debt there became larger than his means to discharge it. Before that catastrophe overtook him he was the principal actor in a lively scene at the tavern. Something or other caused an outbreak of fault-finding ...
— Inns and Taverns of Old London • Henry C. Shelley

... by that want of speech. I have repeatedly asked for room, and received no syllable in return. I have persisted in my request, and the clerk has nodded his head at me. Until a traveler is known, these gentlemen are singularly sparing of speech, especially in the West. The same economy of words runs down from the great man at the office all through the servants of the establishment. It arises, I believe, entirely from that want of courtesy ...
— Volume 2 • Anthony Trollope

... a house at which Sir Charles became very intimate but not till some years later. About this time Lady Strachie remembers the interest with which, as a young girl at her aunt's table, she glanced down the row of guests to catch the profile ...
— The Life of the Rt. Hon. Sir Charles W. Dilke V1 • Stephen Gwynn

... A small, but distinct, genus, with great difference among species; intermediate by its habits between Cortinarius ...
— The Mushroom, Edible and Otherwise - Its Habitat and its Time of Growth • M. E. Hard

... me, ye climes! which poets love to laud; Match me, ye harems of the land! where now I strike my strain, far distant, to applaud Beauties that ev'n a cynic must avow;[ct] Match me those Houries, whom ye scarce allow To taste the gale lest Love should ride the wind, With Spain's dark-glancing daughters—deign to know, There your wise Prophet's Paradise we find, His black-eyed maids of Heaven, ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 2 • George Gordon Byron

... of the century, the "awakening" preacher was everywhere welcome. In America, as in England itself, a strange lethargy had fallen on the churches in that interlude between the Puritan regime and the Revolution. Dead literalism had crept into the pulpits, and conventional conformity too often did duty for ...
— Beginnings of the American People • Carl Lotus Becker

... a reproof to the guilty wretches who visit his country only with fire and sword! How deserved a censure upon the not less guilty men, who dare to vindicate the state of slavery, on the lying pretext, that its victims are of an inferior nature! And scarcely ...
— The History of Mary Prince - A West Indian Slave • Mary Prince

... New Cavalry Brigade remained out-spanned by the mud-holes, while the other column passed through it and bore away in search of the Prieska Road. The rearguard of the moving force was brought up by a Colonial corps, which had originally been raised in Natal by the brigadier of the New Cavalry Brigade. Of course the personnel in the ranks had long since changed. Changed, be it said with regret, ...
— On the Heels of De Wet • The Intelligence Officer

... were four brass wires, and as many more when we reached the palace. I could not stand this: we were literally, as Musa said we should be, being "torn to pieces"; so I appealed to the mace-bearers, protested that Makinga could have no claims on me, as he was not a man of Usui, but a native of Utambara, and brought on a row. On the other hand, as he could not refute this, Makinga swore the mace was all a pretence, and set a-fighting with the Wasui and all ...
— The Discovery of the Source of the Nile • John Hanning Speke

... was past midnight, or thereabout, and the storm, instead of abating, blew stronger and stronger. A passenger, one of the three on the beam astern, felt too numb and wearied out to retain his hold by the spar any longer; he left it, and swimming with a desperate effort up to the boat, begged in God's name to be taken in. Some were for granting his request, others ...
— MacMillan's Reading Books - Book V • Anonymous

... the king, too late, as Peter went forward into the light. 'Don't show yourself!' cried the king. Kurt made a step forward and plucked his brother back. For a time all five men stood still. It seemed that light would never go and then abruptly it was turned off, leaving them blinded. 'Now,' said the king ...
— The World Set Free • Herbert George Wells

... affairs were with us and my mistress kept them for dinner. I helped Hodges with the serving and was in the butler's pantry after Mrs. Childress had left them with their coffee and cigars, and as Hodges had left the door ajar I couldn't help catching a bit of ...
— The Strange Cases of Dr. Stanchon • Josephine Daskam Bacon

... different. There, garments made of skins or covered with feathers were worn in remote antiquity before the art of weaving had become known. The Records recount that in the age of the Kami "there came" (to Japan) "riding on the crest of the waves, a kami dressed in skins of geese," and this passage has been quoted as showing that skins were used for garments in Japan. But it is pointed out by Japanese commentators that this Kami Sukuna-bikona is explicitly stated to have come from a foreign country, ...
— A History of the Japanese People - From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era • Frank Brinkley and Dairoku Kikuchi

... the countries occupied by the French armies, and which have not been united to France, they, as well as other interests, political and commercial, may become the subject of a negotiation, which will present to the Directory the means of proving how much it desires to attain speedily to a happy pacification." That "the Directory is ready to receive, in this respect, any overtures that ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. V. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... A force sufficient to insure an easy triumph over the enemy under Kirby Smith, west of the Mississippi, was immediately put in motion for Texas, and Major-General Sheridan designated for its immediate command; ...
— Memoirs of Three Civil War Generals, Complete • U. S. Grant, W. T. Sherman, P. H. Sheridan

... the Hebrew Jod or Yod, the generative principle, 632-u. "G" said to signify Geometry, 40-m. "G," initial letter of the Hebrew word Geparaith, signifying Sulphur, 780-m. Gabriel, the face of the Ox, on north and left hand, with He, and Fire, 798-m. Gad, as a warrior, has for device the Ram, domicile of Mars, 461-l. Gain, necessity of shaking off the love of; effects of, 40-u. Galen states that differing schools of study were equally important, 711-u. Gamaliel, the Rabbi, taught Paul ...
— Morals and Dogma of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry • Albert Pike

... by which the throne was surrounded, the Duchess of Berry regarded the future with entire confidence. Inclined by nature to optimism, the young and amiable Princess believed herself specially protected by Providence, and would have considered as a sort of impiety anything else than absolute faith in the duration of the monarchy and in respect for the rights of her son. Had any one of the court expressed the slightest doubt as to the future destiny of the CHILD OF MIRACLE, ...
— The Duchess of Berry and the Court of Charles X • Imbert De Saint-Amand

... "A droll city, this Paris!" he said, in conclusion. "I see that it is necessary to go up into the garrets to know ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... all knowledge of causes is so indispensable to M. Comte's theory that he admits "the inevitable tendency of our intelligence towards a philosophy radically Theological, as often as we seek to penetrate, on whatever pretext, into the intimate nature of the phenomena."[89] The exclusion of such knowledge would, of course, be fatal to Theology, since, without taking some account of causes, ...
— Modern Atheism under its forms of Pantheism, Materialism, Secularism, Development, and Natural Laws • James Buchanan

... he, pointing out the paragraph to Pascal, with a smile. "This is the way of men with each other. See the complacency with which one man pardons another for the most necessary, or the best ...
— The Hour and the Man - An Historical Romance • Harriet Martineau

... worth of cochineal. Lay it on a flat plate and bruise it with the blade of a knife. Put it into half a teacupful of alcohol. Let it stand a quarter of an hour, and then filter it through fine muslin. Always ready for immediate use. ...
— The Whitehouse Cookbook (1887) - The Whole Comprising A Comprehensive Cyclopedia Of Information For - The Home • Mrs. F.L. Gillette

... well! Who'd 'a' thunk dat Brer Fox would 'a' come axin' me 'bout dish yer beef, w'ich anybody would er know'd I 'uz a-kyar'n off fer ter save fer 'im, so nobody could ...
— Nights With Uncle Remus - Myths and Legends of the Old Plantation • Joel Chandler Harris

... of the Holland parts of Lincolnshire. Each of these vast levels is equally distinguished by the splendour and conspicuousness of its ancient churches. Travelling by railway between Nieuport and Dixmude, you have on every side of you, if the day be clear, a prospect of innumerable towers and spires, just as you have if you travel by railway between Spalding and Sleaford, or between Spalding and King's Lynn. The difference, perhaps, is that the Lincolnshire churches present ...
— Beautiful Europe - Belgium • Joseph E. Morris

... to what may properly be called the Tragedy of the Italians. After the Sophonisba, and a few pieces of the same period, which Calsabigi calls the first tragic lispings of Italy, a number of works of the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries are cited; but of these none made, or at any rate maintained any considerable reputation. Although all these ...
— Lectures on Dramatic Art and Literature • August Wilhelm Schlegel

... a bowl, and pour over it just enough boiling water to scald it; do not make it soft; let stand until cool. Then add the milk; beat the eggs until very light, add them to the batter, add the flour and salt in which the baking ...
— Public School Domestic Science • Mrs. J. Hoodless

... was divided, and we were outnumbered ten to one. One of the sailors in dislodging a boulder lost his footing and went crashing down with it amid the derisive yells of the pirates. Suddenly the conflict ceased and the pirates withdrew. In a short time we could see them building a number ...
— Tales of the Malayan Coast - From Penang to the Philippines • Rounsevelle Wildman

... as a peacekeeping force between Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots in Cyprus; established by the ...
— The 2007 CIA World Factbook • United States

... consider it possible to make a regulation prohibiting Islam altogether? The encouragement of pig-breeding among natives is recommended by experts as an effective means of ...
— Crescent and Iron Cross • E. F. Benson

... dress, like so many princes, he was so struck, that he could not recover from his admiration. Instead of answering the compliment of Alla ad Deen's mother, he addressed himself to the grand vizier, who could not any more than the sultan comprehend from whence such a profusion of richness could come. "Well, vizier," said he aloud, "who do you think it can be that has sent me so extraordinary a present, and neither of us know? Do you think him worthy of the princess ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments Complete • Anonymous

... as Rollo got on board, he first ran up on the deck. He sat down on the seat upon one side, and then, after looking about a moment, he ran over to the other side, and sat down there. Then he got up, and said that he was going below to look at ...
— Rollo in Holland • Jacob Abbott

... deny that criminal liability, as well as civil, is founded on blameworthiness. Such a denial would shock the moral sense of any civilized community; or, to put it another way, a law which punished conduct which would not be blameworthy in the average member of the community would be too severe for that community to bear. It is only intended to point ...
— The Common Law • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

... wi' plenty o' vegetables. A shin o' beef or say a couple—oh, prime! An' it's my turn ...
— Peregrine's Progress • Jeffery Farnol

... he and the Countess were about to drive up to the Park for their daily ride, which had become an institution, the servant presented a card, saying the gentleman was anxious to see her ladyship at once, if possible. The card was that of Mr. Screw, ...
— Doctor Claudius, A True Story • F. Marion Crawford

... head slowly, in sinister fashion, and stared at their troubled faces in turn. "See here; luk," he resumed solemnly, with lowered voice, "honest tu God, in me own mind I du believe he is th' man that done ut." He paused—"but provin' ut's a diff'runt matther. We must foller this up an' get some shtronger evidence ...
— The Luck of the Mounted - A Tale of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police • Ralph S. Kendall

... pale face, caused less by sympathy than by sheer weariness and heat. The small receiving room of St. Isidore's was close and stuffy, surcharged with odors of iodoform and ether. The Chicago spring, so long delayed, had blazed with a sudden fury the last week in March, and now at ten o'clock not a capful of air strayed into the room, even through the open windows that ...
— The Web of Life • Robert Herrick

... Vais'e@sika sutras were earlier than the Nyaya. It seems to me to be perfectly certain that the Vais'e@sika sutras were written before Caraka (80 A.D.); for he not only quotes one of the Vais'e@sika sutras, but the whole foundation of his medical physics is based on the Vais'e@sika physics [Footnote ref 1]. The La@nkavatara sutra (which as it was quoted by As'vagho@sa is earlier than 80 A.D.) also makes allusions to the atomic doctrine. ...
— A History of Indian Philosophy, Vol. 1 • Surendranath Dasgupta

... "Suppose a policeman should see me! They watch those closed houses. And suppose—suppose ...
— No. 13 Washington Square • Leroy Scott

... Andrew Chamier was of Huguenot descent, and had been a stock-broker. He was a man of liberal education. 'He acquired such a fortune as enabled him, though young, to quit business, and become, what indeed he seemed by nature intended for, a gentleman.' Hawkins's Johnson, p. 422. In 1764 he was Secretary in the War Office. In 1775 he was appointed ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 1 • Boswell, Edited by Birkbeck Hill

... no need; as a matter of course he will come to dinner with us. However, I will ask him when he comes in this morning. I have ordered some good wine. Nora, you can't think how I am looking ...
— A Doll's House • Henrik Ibsen

... soul of it. The captains in port were so delighted with Joe's foreknowledge, that they clubbed, and presented him this pot as a testimony of their gratitude and esteem. He'd got to be popular among them, Mr. Dodge, and that was ...
— Homeward Bound - or, The Chase • James Fenimore Cooper

... come in my way not once or twice, but thrice; and now you die! Ha! Ha!" Reaching for a spoon, Susie stabbed Meeteetse Ed on the second china button of ...
— 'Me-Smith' • Caroline Lockhart

... from remark to remark, with no prompting from Isabelle, and had got to their life in Germany when the doctor entered the room. Larry shook hands punctiliously with him, inquiring in a special tone: "I hope you have good news of the little fellow, Doctor? I thought I would not go up until ...
— Together • Robert Herrick (1868-1938)

... softened, and with sunset came coolness; this was some slight mitigation to their sufferings; sleep too, promised to bring oblivion; and hope, which a merciful Providence has ordained to cast its halo over the darkest hours, told its flattering tale of possible ...
— Woman on the American Frontier • William Worthington Fowler

... back parlour, he found his wife holding a small rattan elevated over little Lizzy in ...
— The Garies and Their Friends • Frank J. Webb

... upon what he termed the "new-fangled notions" of the present generation. Born and reared amid the rocks and hills of the Bay State, his nature partook largely of the nature of his surroundings, and he grew into manhood with many a rough point adhering to his character, which, nevertheless, taken as a whole, was, like the wild New England scenery, beautiful and grand. None knew Uncle Ephraim Barlow but to respect him, and at the church where he was a worshiper few would have been ...
— Family Pride - Or, Purified by Suffering • Mary J. Holmes

... "Stop a bit," said Buttercup; "I'll soon show you how to do it; just lay your head on the chopping-block, and you'll ...
— Childhood's Favorites and Fairy Stories - The Young Folks Treasury, Volume 1 • Various

... lose myself upon a Subject of so great Extent as that of Fame, I have treated it in a particular Order and Method. I have first of all considered the Reasons why Providence may have implanted in our Mind such a Principle of Action. I have in the next Place shewn from many Considerations, first, that Fame is ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... white, with a modified US coat of arms in the center between the large blue initials V and I; the coat of arms shows a yellow eagle holding an olive branch in one talon and three arrows in the other with a superimposed shield of vertical red and white stripes ...
— The 2001 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... yacht, and everything belonging to her, were in some indefinite but very real danger, took afresh a strong hold of him, and the persuasion that the master of the brig was going there to help did not by any means assuage his alarm. The fact only served to complicate his uneasiness with ...
— The Rescue • Joseph Conrad

... the Great, who led an army to the Caspian shore and captured Derbend about 1722. This threatening movement upon the confines of Asia inevitably involved Russia in war with the Turks and with the Persians, for whom the Caucasian mountains represented a great fortress, barring the onward march of a powerful Christian empire toward their dominions. For the Russians, on their side, it became of vital importance to break through the barrier that separated them from Georgia, to occupy the country between the two seas, ...
— Studies in Literature and History • Sir Alfred Comyn Lyall

... her head. She was white and shaken. The reality was even worse than she had expected, and the thought of Cecil's bitterness of disillusion weighed on her like a nightmare. She tried to speak, but her lips trembled and Erskine drew near with a ...
— The Independence of Claire • Mrs. George de Horne Vaizey

... the house," said Dave. "If you'd like to take a look inside I'll unlock the door. But it's a very poor place—a big ...
— Dave Porter at Star Ranch - Or, The Cowboy's Secret • Edward Stratemeyer

... in training and so possessed the faculty of going to sleep when his head struck the pillow. As a consequence the rest of ...
— The Half-Back • Ralph Henry Barbour

... woo a widow must not dally He must make hay while the sun doth shine; He must not stand with her, shall I, shall I, But boldly say, Widow, thou must ...
— The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. • Washington Irving

... in was a log house, sealed inside. The cracks were chinked with dirt and mud, and it was weather boarded on the outside. You couldn't tell it was a log house. It had two rooms. In them times you didn't cook in the house you lived in. You had a kitchen built off from the house you lived in just like ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States - Volume II. Arkansas Narratives. Part I • Work Projects Administration

... returned home with her Aunt Sarah, and Harry of course followed, accompanied by his father, the general, who, finding a house in the neighbourhood vacant, engaged it for the sake of being near Captain Maynard, and thus enabling the young people to be together without depriving himself of his son's society. Harry's regiment was in India, and he was under orders to rejoin it. Though fond of his profession, ...
— Clara Maynard - The True and the False - A Tale of the Times • W.H.G. Kingston

... the most respectable of the creations of his order by James, and had inherited, with many of the virtues of his ancestor, an estate which placed him amongst the greatest landed proprietors of the county. But, as it had been an invariable rule never to deduct a single acre from the inheritance of the eldest son, and the extravagance of his mother, who was the daughter of a nobleman, had much embarrassed the affairs of his father, Sir Edward, on coming into possession of his estate, had wisely determined to withdraw from the gay world, by renting ...
— Precaution • James Fenimore Cooper

... money—but she may have interest that would be of use to him. And there would be nothing unnatural in her leaving something to Eugenia or to Jacinth. I don't suppose she means to leave everything to the Elvedons, for a good deal would have been her own share in any case, and a good deal her husband must have left her. By the bye, I have always forgotten to ask Miss Scarlett if the Harper girls she has, or had—some one said they had left—were any relation to the Elvedon family. ...
— Robin Redbreast - A Story for Girls • Mary Louisa Molesworth

... friends, or that I think you will like each other, for I know that that is the surest way to make you determine you never could, would, or should be. But I do think you will like Pamela, and I thought it would be nice for you to get to know one of your future companions a little before meeting ...
— Kitty Trenire • Mabel Quiller-Couch

... 312, which was probably a mastaba, though the walls were not observed, the well was but 2 metres deep. The chamber was at the west, and was just large enough to contain the pottery coffin and a few pots. The coffin was of the short type (3 feet long); the ...
— El Kab • J.E. Quibell

... one remembers that the American in the Spanish illustrated papers is represented as a hog, and generally with the United States flag for trousers, and Spain as a noble and valiant lion. Yet it would appear that the lion is willing to save a few dollars on freight by buying his armament from his hoggish neighbor, ...
— Cuba in War Time • Richard Harding Davis

... cried, "I've SAID good night," and so went on to his flat. The unquenchable demand, the wearisome insatiability of sex! When everything else has gone, then it shows itself bare in the bleak small hours. And at first it had seemed so light a matter! He went to bed, feeling dog-tired, he went to bed at an hour and with a finished completeness that Merkle would have regarded as entirely becoming in a young gentleman ...
— The Research Magnificent • H. G. Wells

... this man!" Her fierce, angry cry woke the echoes. In a moment there was the sound of hurrying feet, the sudden opening of a door, and again a shaft of light cut through the hall. Men and women rushed in from the adjoining room with loud and eager inquiry. Then Sir John, ...
— The Brown Mask • Percy J. Brebner

... that Moore had lost a child, he wrote to him, "I enter fully into your misery, for I feel myself entirely absorbed in my children. I have such tenderness for ...
— My Recollections of Lord Byron • Teresa Guiccioli

... have here a little witness that never lies, and, mindful of the fallibility of ordinary witnesses, I called it in. It is a new, compact, little motion camera which has just been perfected to do automatically what the big moving-picture ...
— The Dream Doctor • Arthur B. Reeve

... now, and that I may never die in sin, but I think it an honor to oppose these Sassanagh laws; an', for that matther, to die opposin' them; however, as to myself, Mr. Alick, I am by nature of a peaceable, quiet turn, ...
— The Tithe-Proctor - The Works of William Carleton, Volume Two • William Carleton

... his bishopric. I visited the island of Romblon, and the three provinces of the island of Panay, confirming in those islands 102,636 persons; the island of Negros and half of Cebu, in which two districts 1 confirmed 23,800, as I inform your Majesty by a separate letter. I have employed one-half year in this first visit, without the loss of a second of time, taking advantage ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 (Vol 28 of 55) • Various

... liquor having been introduced into the tun (either by means of the mashing machine or separately), the rakes are set going, so that the mash may become thoroughly homogeneous, and after a short time the rakes are stopped and the mash allowed to rest, usually for a period of about two hours. After this, "taps are set"—i.e. communication is established between the mash-tun and the vessel into which the wort runs—and ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 3 - "Brescia" to "Bulgaria" • Various

... summoned to breakfast in a little saloon of the hacienda. The table was covered with natural luxuries produced upon the spot—fine purple and muscatel grapes from the adjacent vineyard, delicious melons from the garden, and generous wines made on the estate. The repast was heightened by ...
— The Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus (Vol. II) • Washington Irving

... zest and exhaustless resources of invention, and hurries his readers breathlessly along, from one astonishing and audacious situation to another, till the book is flung down at finis with a chuckle of ...
— Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son • George Horace Lorimer

... the fierce rapidity with which he sped toward the mountains, the sound of his feet already merged in that other, vaster tramping, and then he turned—to watch himself. For a similar transformation was going forward in himself, and with the happiness of wild amazement he saw it. Already, indeed, it was accomplished. All white and shining lay the sunlight over his own extended form. Power was in his limbs; he rose above the ground in some new way; ...
— The Centaur • Algernon Blackwood

... rejoiced at the efficiency of our Navy we too seldom recollected that it was primarily due to a superbly effective system of education built up by the efforts of a few great men loyally ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 150, January 12, 1916 • Various

... too, is painted with a rising sun which sheds its beams on every hand, and this flag is now for ever famous, so great and wonderful have been the victories in which it has been borne ...
— Peeps at Many Lands: Japan • John Finnemore

... space to sit at a table, and also to get at his luggage in order either to pack it or to unpack it; lastly, he wants a reasonable amount of standing room. A fair-sized tent ought to include the figures drawn in the diagram; and I have indicated, by lines and shaded spaces, the section of various descriptions of tents ...
— The Art of Travel - Shifts and Contrivances Available in Wild Countries • Francis Galton

... this population, it would be better for our southern cities, where they principally reside." Nothing can be more plain then, than that the Colonization Society, in its efforts to remove the free people of color, is accomplishing a work to which the citizens of the South, whether friends or foes to the Society, have given their decided approbation.'—[Idem, ...
— Thoughts on African Colonization • William Lloyd Garrison

... circling glance showed him that he had no sure covert near at hand. It would not do to risk their passing him there. The border of woodland was narrow and not dense enough for close inspection. He was forced to turn back up the canyon, in the hope of soon finding a hiding place or a break in the wall where ...
— To the Last Man • Zane Grey

... on board of?—the same ship that we were in not one hour ago?—the silent, melancholy vessel, now all hands laughing, screaming, huzzaing, dancing, and polkaing up and down the deck like maniacs? And then when the excitement was a little over, and we became more rational, Why were we ordered home? was the first surmise. We had been sent out on a seven years' expedition, and we had not yet been out four. The surveys were not half finished. ...
— Borneo and the Indian Archipelago - with drawings of costume and scenery • Frank S. Marryat

... to resume my work, I heard a friend of mine who whispered, rubbing his hands: "Good old Bernstorff! Kind old von Paepen! ...
— Defenders of Democracy • Militia of Mercy

... sweet!" said Mrs. Crome; and then she kissed Beth, and Beth noticed that she had been eating onions, and for long afterwards she associated the smell with theatres, frivolous talk, and a fair-haired woman smiling fatuously ...
— The Beth Book - Being a Study of the Life of Elizabeth Caldwell Maclure, a Woman of Genius • Sarah Grand

... How can the modern American Ritualistic Spire be here! The well-known tapering brown Spire, like a closed umbrella on end? How can that be here? There is no rusty rim of a shocking bad hat between the eye and that Spire in the real prospect. What is the rusty rim that now intervenes, and confuses the vision of at least ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 11, June 11, 1870 • Various

... fell rattling on the ground, and now—no, there was no deception, the wounded man's chest rose under her ear, she heard the faint throbbing of his heart, the feeble flutter of a gasping breach. ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... was surprised by the movements which secured to us a line of supplies. He appreciated its importance, and hastened to try to recover the line from us. His strength on Lookout Mountain was not equal to Hooker's command in the valley below. From Missionary Ridge he ...
— Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Complete • Ulysses S. Grant

... was followed, and Bert was given quite a quantity of the tender meat. At first it was necessary to pass it down his throat with draughts of water, but later, much to the surprise and joy of the boys, he began, ...
— The Call of the Beaver Patrol - or, A Break in the Glacier • V. T. Sherman

... thought Yourii, as, sincerely grieved, he listened to the sound of her faltering footsteps. As she went towards the other room, Lialia, doubting and distressed, felt as if she were frozen. It seemed as though she were wandering in a dark wood. She glanced at a mirror, and saw the reflection of her own ...
— Sanine • Michael Artzibashef

... summer of 1788 the New York Convention assembled at Poughkeepsie to consider the question of the ratification of the Constitution of the United States. Forty-six of the sixty-five delegates at first stoutly opposed ratification. Hamilton in a series of speeches upheld the Constitution, and when the vote was taken a majority of three sustained his position. The following is an extract from one ...
— Standard Selections • Various

... of two short streets, 8 feet wide composed entirely of yadoyas of various grades, with a picturesquely varied frontage of deep eaves, graceful balconies, rows of Chinese lanterns, and open lower fronts. The place is full of people, and the four bathing-sheds were crowded. Some energetic invalids bathe twelve times a day! Every one who was walking about carried a ...
— Unbeaten Tracks in Japan • Isabella L. Bird

... there that, by an instinct, they lingered behind the others, unwilling to break the enchantment of their isolation from the land, and half-dreading the unknown trials, or joys, which awaited, surely enough, their first steps upon the soil. As they crossed the plank they looked back, obeying a common impulse, at the deserted deck. Their chairs had already been moved away, and the leeward corner, which had seemed so much their own, was filled up by a small group of sailors who were quarrelling about the division of pourboires. The drive to Miraflores is long and ...
— Robert Orange - Being a Continuation of the History of Robert Orange • John Oliver Hobbes

... where he arrived at the age of seventeen, almost penniless, and without recommendations. Failing to obtain work here he continued on to Philadelphia, where he arrived, disappointed but not discouraged. He now had but one dollar, and a few copper coins, in the world. Being hungry, he bought some bread, and with one roll under either arm, and eating the third, he passed up the street on which his destined wife lived, and she beheld him as he presented this ridiculous appearance. Obtaining employment, he secured ...
— Hidden Treasures - Why Some Succeed While Others Fail • Harry A. Lewis

... young boy making another attempt, that was not easy; for the lower part of the ladder had been drawn again into the door, and when another pull was given, the line broke and the ladder remained firm. The case was really perplexing. Pencroft stormed. There was a comic side to the situation, but he did not think it funny at all. It was certain that the settlers would end by reinstating themselves in their domicile and driving out the intruders, but when and how? this is what they were not able ...
— The Mysterious Island • Jules Verne

... themselves both as judges in the highest court of the province and as barristers and pleaders. In every branch of the public services open to Indians and in all the liberal professions, as well as in the civic and political life of their country, the Bengalees have played a leading part, not restricted even to their own province, and in the very distinguished person of Lord Sinha, Bengal has just provided for the first time an Indian to represent the King-Emperor as governor of ...
— India, Old and New • Sir Valentine Chirol

... for this soup and coffee," repeated Carroll, and the man started. There was something in his look and tone that commanded respect even in this absurdity. In reality, for the time, he was almost a madman. His fixed idea reasserted itself. At that moment, if it had been possible that his enemy, the man who had precipitated all this upon him, could have entered the room, there would have been murder done, and again for the moment his mind overlapped ...
— The Debtor - A Novel • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... TNT! But one thing at a time is enough. Let's attend to this one first. Ah! Here ...
— Jimgrim and Allah's Peace • Talbot Mundy

... may be just or unjust, but any fair-minded man will admit that it is England's war, not Ireland's. When it is over, if England wins, she will hold a dominant power in this world, and her manufactures and her commerce will increase by leaps and bounds. Win or lose, Ireland will go on, in our old round of misgovernment, intensified by a grinding poverty which will make life intolerable. ...
— Six days of the Irish Republic - A Narrative and Critical Account of the Latest Phase of Irish Politics • Louis Redmond-Howard

... gentle-natured, and a simple wooer, Since from myself I stand in doubt to fly, Lady, to thee my heart's poor gift would I Offer devoutly: and, by tokens sure, I know it faithful, fearless, constant, pure, In its conceptions ...
— The Life of John Milton Vol. 3 1643-1649 • David Masson

... shall transcribe is a sonnet, to which the Latin words printed below it might be prefixed as a ...
— England's Antiphon • George MacDonald

... is not that I cannot find time, but I am so jealous of my love that I would rather die than let it be known publicly. I have been thinking of inviting you all to dine with me at Frascati. I will send you a phaeton, and I trust that some lucky accident will smile upon ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... not above the middle height, but with a remarkable chest, both broad and deep; yet he was not unwieldy, like Dr. Amboyne, but clean-built, and symmetrical. An agreeable face, with one remarkable feature, a mouth full of iron resolution, and a slight humorous ...
— Put Yourself in His Place • Charles Reade

... mind him,' said Mrs. Pott, in the most obliging voice—'you give yourself a great deal of unnecessary trouble, Mrs. Hunter. You'll do very well ...
— The Pickwick Papers • Charles Dickens

... the face of her neurasthenia did not confuse him. Confusion was a quality foreign to Hazlitt. He courted her as a lover and proselyter. His proselyting consisted of vigorous denunciations of the things which contributed to the neurasthenia of his beloved. He declaimed ...
— Erik Dorn • Ben Hecht

... victory of the third estate, and because they could not trust the guard of the king, procured the substitution for it of German and Swiss troops. The excitement caused by this proceeding, and the news of Necker's dismissal, led to a mob of the rough Parisian populace, who seized weapons from the workshops, and forced the surrender of the Bastille, the grim old prison where political offenders had been immured,—the visible monument of ages of royal tyranny,—which they razed to the ...
— Outline of Universal History • George Park Fisher

... on two continents. Humboldt says: "I inferred the probability of the western nations of the new continent having had communication with the east of Asia long before the arrival of the Spaniards from a comparison of the Mexican and Tibeto-Japanese calendars, from the correct orientation of the steps of the pyramidal elevations towards the different quarters of the heavens, and from the ancient myths and traditions of the four ages or four epochs ...
— The Naturalist in Nicaragua • Thomas Belt

... visit the shrine of Saint Cataldo, a jovial nightmare in stone. And they who desire a literary pendant to this fantastic structure should read the life of the saint written by Morone in 1642. Like the shrine, it is the quintessence of insipid exuberance; there is something preposterous in its ...
— Old Calabria • Norman Douglas

... the mortise and square lines across with a sharp pencil in order to avoid leaving knife marks on the finished piece. Then locate the sides of the mortise from the thickness of the tenon, already determined, and gage between the cross lines. As in the case of like tenons, if there are a number of mortises all alike, set the gage ...
— Handwork in Wood • William Noyes

... it is here where he finds his greatest opposition. It is only following out the idea of the French writer who said, "Mediocrity alone is jealous." The constant desire of this class of white people to rise to the highest level aggravates them upon seeing a Negro reaching out for or obtaining in any way that which they may have or may be seeking, and they "take it out" by greater assumption of superiority especially over those of the race who have reached ...
— Twentieth Century Negro Literature - Or, A Cyclopedia of Thought on the Vital Topics Relating - to the American Negro • Various

... slept awhile; then awoke to the worst solitude a vexed soul knows—those terrible "small hours" of the morning. Then, every mere insect of evil omen that daylight has kept in bounds grows to the size of an elephant, and what was the whirring of his wings becomes discordant ...
— When Ghost Meets Ghost • William Frend De Morgan

... far-off founder of the house, With its red gates abutting to the road? — A palace, though its outer wings are shorn, And domes of glittering tiles. The wall without Has tottered into ruin, yet remain The straggling fragments of some seven courts, The wreck of seven fortunes: roof and eaves Still hang together. From this chamber ...
— A Lute of Jade/Being Selections from the Classical Poets of China • L. Cranmer-Byng

... had received so many new and very serious impressions—such as the retreat from Smolensk, his visit to Bald Hills, and the recent news of his father's death—and had experienced so many emotions, that for a long time past those memories had not entered his mind, and now that they did, they did not act on him with nearly their former strength. For Denisov, too, the memories awakened by the name of Bolkonski belonged to a distant, romantic past, when after ...
— War and Peace • Leo Tolstoy

... Murchison himself is an illustrious follower of these and kindred branches of science. A writer in the 'Quarterly Review' cites him as a "singular instance of a man who, having passed the early part of his life as a soldier, never having had the advantage, or disadvantage as the case might have ...
— Self Help • Samuel Smiles

... Embrons, had a brother who would have been the heir to the throne but for the little prince. He was a wicked man, and hated his nephew, but when the boy was born he was away at the wars, and did not return till five years later. Then he lost no time in ...
— The Red Romance Book • Various



Words linked to "A" :   high-muck-a-muck, draw a line, for a song, as a formality, a la carte, take a bow, adenine, take a hop, take a dare, in a bad way, explode a bombshell, get a load, strike a note, spend a penny, chlorophyll a, hang by a thread, paint a picture, A-scan ultrasonography, to a higher place, Thomas a Becket, time and a half, beyond a shadow of a doubt, take a breath, in a broad way, have a good time, menage a trois, call it a day, a capella singing, shoot a line, deaf as a post, a few, a great deal, characteristic root of a square matrix, Saint Thomas a Becket, drag a bunt, a good deal, biochemistry, quite a, give a hang, A-horizon, A-bomb, do a job on, to a man, A-list, object of a preposition, vitamin A, a hundred times, botulinum toxin A, angstrom, rub-a-dub, feel like a million, in a higher place, son of a bitch, micromillimeter, moment of a magnet, as a matter of fact, blow a fuse, turn on a dime, pied-a-terre, vis-a-vis, pit-a-pat, a bit, have a fit, two-a-penny, in a way, give a damn, a million times, hemophilia A, in a beastly manner, Linear A, get a noseful, in a pig's eye, at a low price, draw a bead on, drop a line, in a heartfelt way, give it a try, a lot, nucleotide, on a lower floor, have a bun in the oven, make a point, cock-a-doodle-doo, take a powder, of a sudden, element of a cone, broth of a man, micromicron, folie a deux, imaginary part of a complex number, a fortiori, get a look, make a stink, as a group, for a while, pate a choux, one at a time, a trifle, to a T, ring-a-rosy, to a lower place, beyond a doubt, take a chance, play a joke on, cock-a-hoop, domain of a function, hepatitis A, A'man, naked as a jaybird, ring-around-a-rosy, for a bargain price, catch a wink, abatement of a nuisance, a little, run a risk, moment of a couple, rat-a-tat-tat, degree of a polynomial, letter, a cappella singing, strike a chord, without a stitch, draw a blank, strike a blow, get a whiff, line-at-a-time printer, retinol, all of a sudden, immunoglobulin A, in a flash, turn a blind eye, take a look, turn a trick, rent-a-car, A-line, rope-a-dope, quite a little, 5-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, purine, cock-a-leekie, at a loss, turn a loss, take a crap, cap-a-pie, at a time, go a long way, take a shit, turn a profit, al-Gama'a al-Islamiyya, a priori, antiophthalmic factor, many a, throw a fit, bright as a new penny, touch a chord, to a great extent, eigenvalue of a matrix, send a message, dehydroretinol, micromillimetre, current unit, in a similar way, character-at-a-time printer, provitamin A, bric-a-brac, turn a nice dollar, a-okay, a Kempis, page-at-a-time printer, A level, range of a function, A-one, angstrom unit, term of a contract, a la mode, hang by a hair, Al-Jama'a al-Islamiyyah al-Muqatilah bi-Libya, have a look, lobster a la Newburg, not by a blame sight, half a dozen, A battery, picometer, love-in-a-mist, smart as a whip, take a breather, catch a glimpse, at a lower place, haemophilia A, man-on-a-horse, make a motion, make a clean breast of, St. Thomas a Becket, give a hoot, a-ok, to a greater extent, a posteriori, have a ball, a cappella, once in a while, tete-a-tete, care a hang, rat-a-tat, since a long time ago, element of a cylinder, in a low voice, millimicron, after a fashion, nm, amp, get a line, deoxyadenosine monophosphate, pull a face, to a lesser extent, terminus a quo, Thomas a Kempis, even a little, raise a stink, give it a whirl, axerophthol, grind to a halt, in a nutshell, hardly a, group A, degree of a term, a couple of, take a hit, forever and a day, pig-a-back, ampere, play a trick on, take a leak, blood group, picometre, have a go at it, jack-a-lantern, roman a clef, not by a long sight, like a shot, turn a nice dime, have a go, on a regular basis, type A, pull a fast one on, tete a tete, take a joke, coenzyme A, blood type, beat a retreat, make a face, hepatitis A virus, A horizon, chock-a-block, take a dive, A-team, on a higher floor, feel like a million dollars



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